Thursday Oct 30, 2014

Fashion films of the week: Paul Smith, Chloé, Topshop

Here's our latest selection of cool fashion films from the past seven days, which includes a stunning cycling-inspired short, some fashionable partying and a look at New York City. Paul Smith  This sharp film from Paul Smith (himself a big fan of pedal power) was created to celebrate the...
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TV

Fashion films of the week: Paul Smith, Chloé, Topshop
Thursday Oct 30, 2014
Fashion films of the week: Paul Smith, Chloé, Topshop

Here's our latest selection of cool fashion films from the past seven days, which includes a stunning cycling-inspired short, some fashionable partying and a look at New York City. Paul Smith  This sharp film from Paul Smith (himself a big fan of pedal power) was created to celebrate the launch of the new Paul Smith 531 performance cycling collection from the brand. Pro cyclist David Millar stars in the piece as the pack gets whittled down from 5, to 3, to 1. http://youtu.be/_3ETSvI1RKI Chloé  This short clip, set to a soundtrack by Say Lou Lou x Lindstrom's "Games for Girls," showcases the pop-up 'Chloé Club' the brand created during the recent Paris fashion week. Marianne Faithfull and Anna Calvi both took to the stage to entertain the assembled fashionistas. http://youtu.be/RuKjgKSZ0SE Topshop Tophop and Topman are landing in New York City with a new flagship set to open on 5th Avenue at the start of next month. In this film, stylist and creative consultant Kate Foley shows off some of the brand's clothes and explains her relationship with her city. http://youtu.be/2gCx4Ocij1c Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2014.

Mumm champagne taps French DJ David Guetta for endorsement
Wednesday Oct 29, 2014
Mumm champagne taps French DJ David Guetta for endorsement

Champagne house Mumm is hoping to capture a younger, more dynamic demographic after teaming up with French DJ David Guetta in a partnership that will see its brand of bubbly featured in his upcoming new music video.The partnership with a figure from the music industry marks a first for the champagne house. In a teaser video for his newest track “Dangerous,” Guetta plays a Formula One race car driver surrounded by your usual cast of fast cars, beautiful women and, of course, indiscriminate popping of corks and bubbly. The champagne house is an official sponsor of the F1. Mumm is perhaps hoping that Guetta will do for it what hip hop artists like Nelly, Drake, Soulja Boy and Gucci Mane did for Moscato wines -- turn it into the brand of choice for the electronic music crowd. Moscato owes its meteoric rise in growth and popularity in the US to hip hop artists who glamorized the sweeter, lighter alcohol, which has been called the new ‘Cristal.’ Watch the teaser for the Guetta video at http://bit.ly/1FVHTQC. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2014.

Tom Dugan: The man behind the man who hunted Nazis
Wednesday Oct 29, 2014
Tom Dugan: The man behind the man who hunted Nazis

NEW YORK (AP) — Tom Dugan's favorite review of his work wasn't in a newspaper or on TV. It was uttered by a teen after a performance of his one-man play "Wiesenthal." "He just said, 'Wow. I thought this was going to suck,'" Dugan recalls with a laugh. Turning expectations on their heads is something of a specialty for the playwright and author, who is making his New York stage debut this fall with his show about famed Nazi hunter Simon Wiesenthal. "It's not a lecture," he says. "When you go to the theater, it should be special. You could stay home and watch television. It better BE something." Wiesenthal was a Holocaust survivor who helped track down numerous war criminals following World War II and then spent the later decades of his life fighting anti-Semitism and prejudice against all people. Dugan's 90-minute play is set in 2003 as the aging Wiesenthal welcomes a group of students to his office while also keeping tabs on the hunt for an at-large Nazi. It's playing at the Acorn Theatre at Theatre Row. The actor has shaved the top of his head to mimic Wiesenthal's baldness and dons a 50-pound fat suit to more closely resemble him. He's nailed the Austrian dialect and the mannerisms of the then-95-year-old. "I never thought of anyone else playing the role," Dugan says. "I'm a 53-year-old kid from New Jersey. It's a real nice assignment for an actor." The Wiesenthal who emerges is fond of dirty jokes and not at all holy. "I have no interest in saints. I can't relate to them," says Dugan. "There's no flaws in them. So all the characters I write about are deeply flawed. That's what makes them interesting." The play makes the Holocaust accessible, but also is a way for the Los Angeles-based writer and actor to honor his father, a decorated World War II veteran who helped liberate the Buchenwald concentration camp. In his other plays, Dugan has explored slavery and mental illness via Frederick Douglass, Robert E. Lee and Mary Lincoln. All are factually based and carefully researched. "My son says to me, 'Can you write a comedy?'" His next one will tackle former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy, but he'll pass on playing the title role. "Although I think I would be excellent in a pillbox hat, I might have to give it to someone else," he jokes. Young people are his favorite audience and that's certainly the case with "Wiesenthal." Dugan hopes he can teach them to never forget the past and embrace tolerance. Once at a talk-back in Beverly Hills, California, a girl stood up in surprise. "This really happened?" she asked. Dugan said it did. She replied: "When I was growing up, my parents told me the Holocaust was greatly exaggerated." The audience was stunned. Dugan then asked the woman about her family and the question revealed a showstopping nugget: "My great-grandfather was Adolf Eichmann," she said. The actor spent the rest of the time explaining to the audience that the young woman wasn't to blame for the sins of her family. And she later thanked him for revealing the truth. "I earned my money that night," he says. ___ Mark Kennedy is at http://twitter.com/KennedyTwits ___ Online: http://www.wiesenthaltheplay.com Copyright (2014) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

'Scream' series to premiere ahead of Halloween 2015
Wednesday Oct 29, 2014
'Scream' series to premiere ahead of Halloween 2015

The TV adaptation of Wes Craven's horror movie franchise will attempt to spook MTV viewers from October 2015, the network announced.After revealing the cast in August, MTV has ordered a full season of "Scream" and dated the premiere. Inspired by the four features from director Wes Craven and writer Kevin Williamson, the series is due to arrive on the small screen in October, just in time for Halloween. Details are still hazy on the plot of the 10 episodes ordered. There is even a possibility that Ghostface, the killer in the famous white mask, may not appear, or at least not at the outset. For the time being, MTV has only introduced the protagonists. Willa Fitzerald will lead the cast in the role of Emma, a popular girl with a hidden shy intellectual side, while Amy Forsyth will play her former best friend Audrey, who is the daughter of a Lutheran priest and dreams of making movies. John Karna will play Noah, Audrey's geeky friend, while Carlson Young will play the leader of the high school's popular crowd. Amadeux Serafini will play a somewhat weird new kid. Developed by Jill Blotevogel and written by Jay Beattie and Dan Dworkin ("Criminal Minds"), the pilot will be directed by Jamie Travis. Wes Craven is involved in the series as an executive producer, unlike Kevin Williamson, the screenwriter behind the movies, who has gone on to other TV projects including the current FOX drama "The Following." Headlined by Neve Campbell, David Arquette and Courteney Cox, the original "Scream" franchise grossed over $600 million at the worldwide box office. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2014.

'Hoarders' psychologist testifies at murder trial
Wednesday Oct 29, 2014
'Hoarders' psychologist testifies at murder trial

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A psychologist who stars on a reality TV show testified at a murder trial that a California man accused of killing an animal control officer had a hoarding disorder and could have reacted violently to anyone trying to take away his many animals. Robin Zasio, from the A&E show "Hoarders," appeared in court for the defense Tuesday in the trial of Joseph Corey, 67, the Sacramento Bee reported (http://bit.ly/100ax27). Zasio founded the Sacramento-based Compulsive Hoarding Center. Corey is accused of shooting and killing Roy Marcum, 45, on Nov. 28, 2012, as Marcum arrived at Corey's home in Galt, about 20 miles south of Sacramento. Marcum was there to remove Corey's multiple dogs and cats amid eviction proceedings. A sheriff's deputy served Corey with an eviction notice a day earlier. Authorities said Corey had garbage stacked 6 feet high. Corey is charged with first-degree murder. But his attorney, Jennifer Mouzis, told jurors during her opening statement Corey was so impaired by his mental disorder that he was incapable of planning the killing beforehand, a requirement for a first-degree conviction. During questioning Tuesday, Mouzis asked Zasio hypothetically how a person facing foreclosure and living with mountains of refuse and multiple dogs and cats in cages strewn with feces would be affected by the likelihood of his animals and prized possessions being taken away. "It would be absolutely devastating," Zasio replied, adding that it could lead the person to become homicidal or suicidal. Asked by the prosecutor if she had ever seen another instance of a person killing someone under the threat of animal removal, Zasio said she had not. Corey was arrested following a 17-hour standoff with police after he shot the officer with a high-powered hunting rifle. Eviction papers were served on Corey, a former electrician and mechanic, after he failed to make a house payment for three years, authorities said. Marcum's mother, Charlotte Marcum, testified at trial that she visited Corey in jail and asked him why he killed her son, the Sacramento Bee reported. She said he told her, "I wanted to kill an officer." Zasio said there are an estimated 4 million hoarders in the country. Copyright (2014) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Movies

Unfinished Orson Welles movie could be screened in 2015
Wednesday Oct 29, 2014
Unfinished Orson Welles movie could be screened in 2015

"The Other Side of the Wind" could finally make it to the silver screen next May, in time for the centenary of the filmmaker's birth, The New York Times reports.Thirty years after his death, Orson Welles' last film could finally be unveiled to the public. The American production company Royal Road has just acquired the rights to the unfinished film "The Other Side of the Wind," putting an end to a multi-year legal battle between the director's daughter Beatrice Welles, his last companion Oja Kodar and the Franco-Iranian production company L'Apostrophe. A satire on the modern film industry, the feature centers on an aging director attempting to finish his movie in spite of difficulties caused by the Hollywood establishment. Filmed in the 1970s, the project hit a road block due to production issues, and only 45 minutes of footage were shot and edited. Welles spent his last decade trying to complete the work, which remained unfinished upon his death in 1985. John Huston, Susan Strasberg, Lilli Palmer and Dennis Hopper are the stars of the unfinished film, from which only a few scenes have been revealed to the public. Producers at Royal Road say they aim to have the existing 45 minutes ready for a screening on May 6, 2015, the 100th anniversary of Orson Welles' birth. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2014.

'Scream' series to premiere ahead of Halloween 2015
Wednesday Oct 29, 2014
'Scream' series to premiere ahead of Halloween 2015

The TV adaptation of Wes Craven's horror movie franchise will attempt to spook MTV viewers from October 2015, the network announced.After revealing the cast in August, MTV has ordered a full season of "Scream" and dated the premiere. Inspired by the four features from director Wes Craven and writer Kevin Williamson, the series is due to arrive on the small screen in October, just in time for Halloween. Details are still hazy on the plot of the 10 episodes ordered. There is even a possibility that Ghostface, the killer in the famous white mask, may not appear, or at least not at the outset. For the time being, MTV has only introduced the protagonists. Willa Fitzerald will lead the cast in the role of Emma, a popular girl with a hidden shy intellectual side, while Amy Forsyth will play her former best friend Audrey, who is the daughter of a Lutheran priest and dreams of making movies. John Karna will play Noah, Audrey's geeky friend, while Carlson Young will play the leader of the high school's popular crowd. Amadeux Serafini will play a somewhat weird new kid. Developed by Jill Blotevogel and written by Jay Beattie and Dan Dworkin ("Criminal Minds"), the pilot will be directed by Jamie Travis. Wes Craven is involved in the series as an executive producer, unlike Kevin Williamson, the screenwriter behind the movies, who has gone on to other TV projects including the current FOX drama "The Following." Headlined by Neve Campbell, David Arquette and Courteney Cox, the original "Scream" franchise grossed over $600 million at the worldwide box office. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2014.

London hotel brings Hogwarts Castle to life for Harry Potter fans
Wednesday Oct 29, 2014
London hotel brings Hogwarts Castle to life for Harry Potter fans

Brace yourselves, Harry Potter fans: A London hotel has created a set of rooms inspired by the world of wizardry and magic, complete with stonewalls, gothic arches, fireplaces and cauldrons.Since being picked up by local British media recently, buzz surrounding the 19th century Georgian House has reached a fever pitch, particularly among Harry Potter fans, for the hotel's Wizard chambers, two rooms that bring the dormitories of Hogwarts to life. Details include stained glass windows, faux stonewalls, wood burning stoves, bedding and drapery in Gryffindor’s signature red and yellow color scheme. Guests sleep under the watchful eye of portraits that hang over their plush, four-poster beds, while owl accents, candles and old-fashioned writing desks invite them to pen letters to friends. The first room sleeps two, with a double, four-poster bed, while the family suite includes a single and double bed in the first room -- also both four-poster -- and a half-tester double bed in the second room. Stays also include a traditional English breakfast (baked beans are homemade and don’t come out of the can) while add-on options include a Muggle Walking Tour of London that takes guests to some of the major landmarks featured in the film, and tickets to the Warner Brothers Studio Tour for The Making of Harry Potter. Rates start at £209 (about US$338) for two. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2014.

Trailer: alternate look at 'Avengers: Age of Ultron'
Wednesday Oct 29, 2014
Trailer: alternate look at 'Avengers: Age of Ultron'

With the first trailer for "Avengers: Age of Ultron" released on October 22, an alternative take on events can be found in a new cut that includes some fresh material.With the superhero team chilling in Tony Stark's luxurious penthouse pad, talk turns to Thor's heavyweight hammer. How is it that no one but Thor can lift the mighty mallet? But heroic down-time banter is gatecrashed by the introduction of Stark's rogue protégé, the Iron Man-esque artificial intelligence known as Ultron -- at which point we rejoin the debut trailer's chain of events. This cut, dubbed a "Special Look" by Marvel, was first shown at a behind-closed-doors fan event at the San Diego Comic-Con in July. The full-length trailer was originally scheduled for a first-time broadcast during the October 28 episode of TV series "Marvel's Agents of SHIELD" but leaked online before Marvel responded by releasing its own high-quality reel ahead of schedule; it was this alternate cut that was then shown publicly as a treat for "Agents of SHIELD" viewers. Trailer - "Get a Special Look at Marvel's 'Avengers: Age of Ultron'" - youtu.be/eGwuoYKhqx8 Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2014.

Award-winning Japanese actor seeks complete art
Wednesday Oct 29, 2014
Award-winning Japanese actor seeks complete art

TOKYO (AP) — In person, Shota Sometani is still and quiet, speaking in a soft, almost lackadaisical voice. His ideal acting role, he says, would be one in which he couldn't rely on facial expressions, such as a character wearing a mask. The 22-year-old, who has acted since age 7, has earned a reputation for serious acting in dozens of ambitious Japanese movies. And his gentle air is not superficial technique, but the drive to be a true actor. In a recent interview with The Associated Press, Sometani made clear he was reaching for something deeper. He demonstrated his ability to express devastating angst in his heart-wrenching portrayal of an abused youngster in Japanese auteur Sion Sono's "Himizu." Sometani won the Marcello Mastorianni Award for best emerging actor at the 2011 Venice Film Festival with his co-star for that work. "I want to do the kind of acting that's convincing and complete, just by standing there, even without any words," he said. "It's a mystery. I don't have a method, even in myself. You have to believe in the role, the blood that's flowing in the character, the basics." Although he has not gotten any Hollywood offers yet, Sometani says he is ready, studying English so he feels comfortable acting in that language. He has also directed short films of his own. Sometani is on track to be possibly the next global star from Japan, following in the footsteps of Toshiro Mifune of Akira Kurosawa's "Seven Samurai" and, more recently, Ken Watanabe, who appeared in "Inception" and "Godzilla." He is in the spotlight for this year's Tokyo Film Festival, starring in Thursday's closing film "Parasyte," a science-fiction thriller directed by Takashi Yamazaki. Based on a manga-comic, the film has characters that are computer graphics, forcing Sometani to try to blow life into them through his acting. The work juxtaposes the horror of body-snatching wormlike aliens with everyday contemporary life, the blood and violence eerily contained but frighteningly real in the small dingy bedrooms, kitchens and classrooms. Sometani believes the claustrophobia and insularity of the Japanese lifestyle make for unique filmmaking. The chaos and weirdness that surround his character in "Parasyte" meant he was called upon to show the purity that was inside the young man he played, he said. In the brutal but beautifully shot "Himizu," set in a desolate Japan after the 2011 Fukushima quake, tsunami and nuclear triple disaster, the child-hero, whom Sometani portrays with both fragility and a frenzy, endures violence, loneliness and disgraceful parenting. We don't expect him to survive. But when he not only pronounces the guilt of the adults who went before him but also vows to do better and become a respectable adult, it is a victorious and moving cinematic moment. "Shota Sometani, a gifted young actor, has a screen presence in 'Himizu' that is reminiscent of the American actor James Dean's performance in the classic film 'East of Eden.' When Shota is on screen you can see the pain behind his eyes," said American director Christopher Ward, who teaches filmmaking at New York Film Academy. "He has a bright future and not just in Japan," Ward said. Sometani, whose favorite actor is the late Philip Seymour Hoffman, renowned for transforming himself into a variety of characters, is also determined to play different roles, people with jobs, a medical doctor, maybe a gangster, not the student role he has customarily played so far, because that would present important challenges for his acting, he said. But always, the best way to develop as an actor, he said, is to just live — and to live as normal a life as possible, although that's increasingly a challenge, given his stardom. "I get told a lot that I look sleepy," he said with a smile, while hardly gesticulating or changing expressions, unlike many actors. "Basically, I love films. That's why I'm doing this. That is what's at my roots. That's all I believe in." ___ Follow Yuri Kageyama on Twitter at https://twitter.com/yurikageyama Copyright (2014) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Events

Opera star falls after singing anthem at Series
Thursday Oct 30, 2014
Opera star falls after singing anthem at Series

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Oops, another national anthem stumble at the World Series. Opera star Joyce DiDonato did just fine singing "The Star-Spangled Banner" before Game 7 Wednesday night at Kauffman Stadium. Then, as the longtime Royals fan from Kansas was walking off the field, she tripped in the batter's box and managed to catch herself. But after regaining her balance, the Grammy Award-winning mezzo-soprano took another step or two and fell to the dirt, as dramatically as she might on the stages of the world's greatest opera houses. The 45-year-old DiDonato laughed at her misstep and the Kansas City crowd cheered her effort. Before Game 5 in San Francisco, county singer Aaron Lewis messed up the lyrics to the anthem. Lewis, acclaimed as the lead singer of the metal band Staind, later apologized for the mistake. Copyright (2014) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Galway Kinnell dies
Wednesday Oct 29, 2014
Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Galway Kinnell dies

MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — Galway Kinnell, the Pulitzer Prize-winning poet who opened up American verse in the 1960s and beyond through his forceful, spiritual takes on the outsiders and underside of contemporary life, has died at age 87. Kinnell's wife, Bobbie Bristol, said he died Tuesday afternoon at their home in Sheffield, Vermont. He had leukemia. Among the most celebrated poets of his time, he won the Pulitzer and National Book Award for the 1982 release "Selected Poems" and later received a MacArthur Genius Fellowship. In 1989, he was named Vermont's poet laureate, and the Academy of American Poets gave him the 2010 Wallace Stevens Award for lifetime achievement. His other books included "Body Rags," ''Mortal Acts, Mortal Words," ''The Past" and his final book of poetry, "Strong Is Your Hold," released in 2006. Kinnell's style blended the physical and the philosophical, not shying from the most tactile and jarring details of humans and nature exploring their greater dimensions. He once told the Los Angeles Times that his intention was to "dwell on the ugly as fully, as far, and as long" as he "could stomach it." In one of his most famous poems, "The Bear," he imagines a hunter who consumes animal blood and excrement and comes to identify with his prey, wondering "what, anyway, was that sticky infusion, that rank flavor of blood, that poetry, by which I lived?" A native of Providence, Rhode Island, and graduate of Princeton University, Kinnell was influenced in childhood by Emily Dickinson and Edgar Allen Poe among others, but was also shaped by his experiences as an adult. He served in the U.S. Navy in World War II, traveled everywhere from Paris to Iran, opposed the Vietnam War and served as a field worker for the civil rights organization CORE (Congress of Racial Equality). Like his longtime friend and contemporary W.S. Merwin, he began weaving in the events of the time into his poetry. In "Vapor Trail Reflected in the Frog Pond," from the 1968 collection "Body Rags," he invokes the chanting style of Walt Whitman to condemn American violence: And I hear, coming over the hills, America singing, her varied carols I hear: crack of deputies' rifles practicing their aim on stray dogs at night, sput of cattleprod, TV going on about the smells of the human body, curses of the soldier as he poisons, burns, grinds, and stabs the rice of the world, with open mouth, crying strong, hysterical curses. Merwin, during a telephone interview Wednesday night, said that he and Kinnell had been "like brothers" and remembered his friend as a "very generous soul." He praised Kinnell's work as "warm-hearted," the creations of "someone who was independent but felt sympathy with other people." University of Vermont poet and English Professor Major Jackson, who read one of Kinnell's poems during an August ceremony at the Vermont Statehouse honoring Kinnell, called him one of "the great quintessential poets of his generation." "In my mind he comes behind that other great New England poet Robert Frost in his ability to write about, not only the landscape of New England, but also its people," said Jackson. "Without any great effort it was almost as if the people and the land were one and he acknowledged what I like to call a romantic consciousness." Kinnell taught at numerous schools, including Reed College and New York University, and for several years was a visiting poet at Sarah Lawrence College. From 2001-2007, he served as chancellor of the poets academy. Bristol said her husband will be buried on the hill behind their home. ____ AP National Writer Hillel Italie contributed to this story from New York. Copyright (2014) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Hancock shares life lessons in new memoir
Wednesday Oct 29, 2014
Hancock shares life lessons in new memoir

NEW YORK (AP) — Herbie Hancock doesn't begin or end his newly published memoir "Possibilities" by recalling any of the many highlights in his 50-plus-year career such as receiving the 2008 Album of the Year Grammy Award for "River: The Joni Letters." Instead, the 74-year-old pianist bookends his life story by recalling a concert with Miles Davis' quintet nearly 50 years ago in Stockholm, Sweden, when he played what he thought was a wrong chord. The trumpeter quickly played some notes that made the chord sound right and unleashed a solo that took the song in a new direction. That night the young pianist learned an important lesson. "We all have a natural human tendency to take the safe route — to do the thing we know will work — rather than taking a chance," Hancock wrote. "But that's the antithesis of jazz, which is all about being in the present ... It's about trusting yourself to respond on the fly. If you can allow yourself to do that, you never stop exploring, you never stop learning, in music or life." In "Possibilities," written with Lisa Dickey, Hancock describes his constantly evolving career: as a child prodigy playing classical musical, a sideman in Davis' legendary mid-1960s quintet, and as a bandleader who went from far-out jazz-fusion with his Mwandishi band, to funk with the Headhunters, to hip-hop on the album "Future Shock" and beyond. Hancock reveals for the first time in the book his crack cocaine addiction in the late '90s. He credits his family and his Buddhist faith with helping him overcome "the biggest obstacle I ever faced." Hancock spoke recently to The Associated Press by telephone from his Los Angeles home. Associated Press: What message are you trying to convey in "Possibilities"? Hancock: The outlook toward having a life that's open to possibilities has worked for me even during my darkest hours. The reason that I write about my drug addiction is because I realized that I could possibly turn those dark days into something positive for others — to show that if I was able to overcome that, you can do it too. ... You have the power to create a life that is constantly moving forward and develop the courage to fight the daily battles against the negative part of yourself. AP: In the book you describe Miles Davis as your "musical mentor." How did he inspire you? Hancock: What I loved was that Miles told us that he paid us to work on things — not to just perfect something in our hotel room and play that just to get applause from the audience. He wanted us to constantly work on new things. He stimulated creativity. He could sense when we had gotten to some point where we had to break the rules in order to go outside the box. AP: Another major influence cited in the book is Buddhism, which you began practicing in 1972. How has Buddhism influenced your approach to music and life? Hancock: One of the most important realizations I had through practicing Buddhism is that the core of my life is not being a musician, it's being a human being. Being a musician is one of the aspects of my life. I'm also a father, husband and a citizen. ... Coming from the perspective of me being a human being first is what opened up for me an exciting perspective of using music to show the great value of the diversity of cultures that exist in the world and how to incorporate different styles of music, combining forces to create something none of us could create alone. AP: When you formed the Headhunters band in 1973, jazz purists accused you of selling out. What motivated you to create Headhunters? Hancock: When Sly Stone did "Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin)" that became one of my favorites. Even though I had this avant-garde band, Mwandishi, I was listening to James Brown and Sly Stone. I was brought up on the South Side of Chicago, which is a blues town. I heard Muddy Waters when I was a kid. For me to do a record like "Headhunters" is going back to my roots. I was tired of doing music that was untethered. I had this inner need at that point to do something that was earthier. I was taking a risk because I might not get a new audience and might alienate the one I already had, but I knew I had to be true to myself. ____ Online: www.herbiehancock.com Copyright (2014) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Tyne Daly to star in B'way's 'It Shoulda Been You'
Wednesday Oct 29, 2014
Tyne Daly to star in B'way's 'It Shoulda Been You'

NEW YORK (AP) — Tony and Emmy Award-winner Tyne Daly and Tony-winner Harriet Harris will be returning to Broadway in a wedding comedy. Producers said Wednesday that the new musical "It Shoulda Been You" will start previews at the Brooks Atkinson Theatre on March 17. David Hyde Pierce, the former "Frasier" star, will direct. The show has a book and lyrics by Brian Hargrove — who is married to Pierce and wrote for the TV show "Caroline in the City" — and music by Barbara Anselmi, the musical director of "The Velveteen Rabbit." It's a behind-the-scenes drama at a wedding between a Jewish bride and Roman Catholic groom. Daly, of "Cagney & Lacey" fame, plays the mother of the bride and Harris plays the groom's mom. The rest of the cast includes Sierra Boggess, David Burtka, Lisa Howard, Edward Hibbert and Steve Rosen. The musical made its debut in 2011 at New Jersey's George Street Playhouse. It will mark a mini-reunion of "Frasier" veterans: Harris, last on Broadway in "Rodgers + Hammerstein's Cinderella," played a kooky agent on the show, while Hibbert played a food critic. The musical also reunites Daly and Boggess, who starred together in the recent Broadway revival of "Master Class." Copyright (2014) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Going inside Tyler Florence's 'Test Kitchen'
Wednesday Oct 29, 2014
Going inside Tyler Florence's 'Test Kitchen'

If you think of Tyler Florence as the cook next door, the guy you can count on for classics like burgers and onion rings, you may be surprised by his latest effort, "Tyler Florence: Inside the Test Kitchen." This time, Florence is switching things up from down home to high tech in a book that stands out from the crowd with its notebook-style binding and iPad-generated photos. The burger? It's still there, but now it's served on "instant bread" buns made with iSi siphons, specialty kitchen equipment, that in this case are used to inject carbon dioxide directly into the batter. The onion ring, meanwhile, has mind-melded with a french fry for something Florence calls a "fronion." We asked Florence to explain just what a fronion is and share a few more insights into his test kitchen. AP: You're known for traditional, comfort food, but in this book you whip out the high-tech tools. Is this a new direction for you? Florence: I've always been a passionate, wildly curious cook. The platforms that you have seen me in before are just the tip of the iceberg of my range, not only as a cook, but as an award-winning restaurant owner, an inventor, a cookbook writer and also a parent. My early career crafted as the guy next door is only part of the picture, one that is very black and white in scope. Our new position is to go deep and challenge conventional cooking that in a lot of ways intimidates home enthusiasts. Inventing a bread that doesn't require yeast to rise was one of our discoveries this year, and the process is way easier than baking bread. Modern kitchen tools like an iSi siphon are going to seem as common place as a microwave. AP: What went into the making of this book? Florence: We had four people working on the book almost full time and the book took a year and a half to make. So if I had to do the math on that, it would be 13,140 hours. It was supposed to be released last year, but we just weren't ready yet. I've never spent this long writing a book, even my first book back in 2001. The content speaks for itself. I feel it's my best, most personal book. AP: Was it tough reinventing so many familiar dishes? Florence: Some days we wanted to give up because what we wanted in a certain recipe began to feel impossible. Or going through the complete cooking process, which in some cases took hours, only to find out we could have made it better at the beginning felt frustrating. But every time we got so close to nailing a certain texture or technique that we were inventing, it was enough to keep pushing. I've never had a better time with my staff making something that felt this important. AP: You really went all out on Thanksgiving, from the cranberry loaf to the spatchcocked turkey with the stuffing tucked under the skin. What inspired you? Florence: The funny thing is that entire chapter was a last minute add-in. We felt that looking at most of the completed manuscript, we needed about 10 more great, iconic recipes. It happened to be last November, so we just jumped into Thanksgiving. My Instagram feed blew up as we were posting pictures. If someone picks up the book for one recipe alone, it's the turkey. I think it's a real game changer. AP: And, finally, the "fronion." Talk us through the team's process in solving the french fry/onion ring dilemma by coming up with an onion ring inside a french fry. Florence: We made onion rings for a week. They were ... I wouldn't say boring, but everything we had certainly tasted before. One day we got take out lunch from a burger place and I grabbed a french fry and an onion ring and tasted both and that started it all. We liquefied french fries into an amazing onion ring batter and created the "fronion" it's a French fry crusted onion ring. You've got to see it to believe it. Mind blowing. ___ Online: http://tylerflorencetestkitchen.wordpress.com/ ___ SUPER-FAST ROAST TURKEY "The Thanksgiving turkey is the centerpiece of the meal, but despite its being cooked every year for generations, it still causes anxiety. The annual conundrum? Getting a flavorful turkey that also looks good — and the rest of dinner — on the table before the grandparents fall asleep," Tyler Florence writes in his new cookbook, "Inside the Test Kitchen." "The first thing we realized was that stuffing the turkey only makes things harder: if you stuff your turkey, you create a very dense material for heat to travel through, and by the time the stuffing is hot in the center, the breast meat of the turkey is totally overcooked. Instead, we piped the stuffing between the skin and the breast. That way, you still get flavorful stuffing while protecting the breast. "We also spatchcocked the turkey. Before you turn and run, let me tell you that it shaved off an hour and 15 minutes of cooking time from the standard Butterball turkey instructions." Start to finish: 2 hours 15 minutes (15 minutes active) Servings: 12 One 10-pound turkey 1 recipe stuffing (see below), in a piping bag or zip-close plastic bag with a corner snipped off Grapeseed or vegetable oil, as needed Kosher salt Ground black pepper 1 bunch fresh sage 1 bunch fresh thyme Heat the oven to 375 F. Remove the heart and giblets from the turkey and reserve; discard the liver. Flip the turkey upside down so the breast is on the cutting board. Using kitchen shears, cut along both sides of the backbone so the bone can be removed. Pull the bone out of the turkey and reserve. Gently but firmly open up the bird a little (you can flatten it if you'd like) and set it on the board with the skin side up. Insert your fingers gently between the skin and breast meat, separating them while keeping the skin attached. You want to create a pocket for the stuffing without tearing the skin. Pipe the stuffing underneath the skin of the bird, creating an even layer of it between the meat and the skin. Rub grapeseed or vegetable oil over the skin, and season liberally with salt and pepper. Do the same to the underside of the bird. Place a large rack in a roasting pan or sheet pan, and put the whole sprigs of herbs on top of the rack. Put the turkey skin side up on top of the herbs. Sandwiching the herbs between the rack and the turkey will prevent them from burning. Put the turkey in the oven and cook for 1 hour and 15 minutes. At this point, the skin should be golden brown and the meat should be 135 F. To take the temperature, insert a meat thermometer into the thickest part of the thigh, staying away from hitting the bone. Tent the turkey with foil and continue to roast until the temperature reaches 160 F in the leg, about another 30 minutes. (The internal temperature will continue to rise as it rests.) Remove the turkey and let it rest for 15 minutes before slicing. Nutrition information per serving: 530 calories; 210 calories from fat (40 percent of total calories); 24 g fat (6 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 245 mg cholesterol; 13 g carbohydrate; 1 g fiber; 1 g sugar; 63 g protein; 760 mg sodium. (Recipe adapted from Tyler Florence's "Inside the Test Kitchen," Clarkson Potter, 2014) ___ TEST KITCHEN STUFFING Start to finish: 20 minutes Makes enough to stuff 1 turkey 4 cups sourdough bread torn into 1-inch pieces, without the crusts 2 tablespoons grapeseed or vegetable oil 1/2 pound sage breakfast sausage, crumbled 1/2 cup diced carrots 1/2 cup diced celery 1/2 cup diced yellow onion 5 fresh sage leaves 3 sprigs fresh thyme, leaves only Kosher salt and ground black pepper 2/3 cup chicken stock 1 egg Heat the oven to 375 F. Toast the bread on a sheet pan in the oven for about 15 minutes, or until crisp and golden. In a large saucepan over medium-high, heat the oil. Add the sausage and let it brown. After it's nice and golden on one side, stir to get color all over. Add the carrots, celery and onion, followed by the sage and thyme. Reduce the heat to medium and cook, stirring occasionally to keep the cooking even. Season with salt and pepper. When the vegetables are aromatic and tender, add the chicken stock and mix to loosen any brown bites from the bottom of the pan. Add the toasted bread and mix well. Transfer the stuffing to a food processor. Process until fairly smooth, adding the egg while pureeing. Transfer the stuffing to a piping bag (or a large zip-close plastic bag with a corner snipped off). Use as directed above. (Recipe adapted from Tyler Florence's "Inside the Test Kitchen," Clarkson Potter, 2014) ___ Michelle Locke tweets at https://twitter.com/Locke_Michelle Copyright (2014) Associated Press. All rights reserved. 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