Friday Apr 18, 2014

Levine designs womenswear with help from fiancee

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. (AP) — Maroon 5 frontman-turned designer Adam Levine says his lack of fashion training is not a problem. "I don't know how to read music, but I can still play. So I don't really give a (expletive) about formal training or going to school," said...
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TV

Levine designs womenswear with help from fiancee
Friday Apr 18, 2014
Levine designs womenswear with help from fiancee

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. (AP) — Maroon 5 frontman-turned designer Adam Levine says his lack of fashion training is not a problem. "I don't know how to read music, but I can still play. So I don't really give a (expletive) about formal training or going to school," said Levine in an interview Thursday at an event for his latest Kmart collection. "You don't have to be trained in everything to be good at it." "The Voice" coach said skepticism of some celebrity designers is warranted, but insisted his collection is not "your average, celebrity-hawked fashion line." "I didn't want it to just be something that I phoned in," Levine said. "So I was really involved in the process." The collection, which retails for $30 or less, includes colorful, casual printed T-shirts, mini crop tops, twill and jean shorts and patterned maxi dresses. Levine's menswear line for Kmart launched last fall. "I kind of know what I like for both men and women. I think that it's a little more difficult and challenging when you're not, it's not something you can conceptualize, or it's not something you can conceive of wearing," he said of designing for the opposite sex. "So I needed to get a little bit of help." Levine's Victoria's Secret model fiancee Behati Prinsloo (bay-AHT'-ee PRINS'-lo) lent him a hand. He looked through Prinsloo's closet for inspiration and the couple collaborated on a few pieces. The clothes are "ideally what you want to see, I guess selfishly, on a lady," he said. ___ Follow Nicole Evatt at http://twitter.com/NicoleEvatt Copyright (2014) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

'The Americans' renewed for third season
Friday Apr 18, 2014
'The Americans' renewed for third season

FX announced it will continue its Cold War-era spy thriller series for an additional season.As critics continue to heap praise on Season 2 of "The Americans," which is scheduled to conclude on May 21, FX said that it has ordered an additional 13 episodes of the show. Created by former CIA officer Joe Weisberg, "The Americans" features Keri Russell and Matthew Rhys in the roles of Elizabeth and Philip Jennings. Formerly known as Nadezhda and Misha, the two KGB operatives have given up their original identities to become sleeper agents, posing as a typical American family in a quiet suburb. The series is set during the 1980s. The 13 episodes of "The Americans" Season 1 attracted an average 3.38 million viewers on FX, including catch-up TV views. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2014.

Bill Clinton jokes with Spacey at benefit concert
Friday Apr 18, 2014
Bill Clinton jokes with Spacey at benefit concert

NEW YORK (AP) — Near the end of the first half of Thursday's 25th Anniversary Rain Forest benefit concert at Carnegie Hall, chairwoman Trudie Styler introduced a man that recently found out he was going to be a grandfather, and out came former President Bill Clinton. After Clinton praised the Rain Forest Foundation, he thanked Sting, Styler, and others for their efforts with the organization. Then he acknowledged Kevin Spacey. "I know Kevin Spacey made fun of me earlier," he told the crowd. Clinton was referring to Spacey doing an imitation of him praising his Netflix series, "House of Cards," where the actor now plays the president of the United States. Spacey walked out on stage and greeted Clinton. The former president told the actor that he always wanted to be in his line of work. But then he quipped to hearty laughs: "Now, damn it, you're in mine." Clinton continued poking fun at Spacey. "I was always accused of getting away with murder, but Spacey actually does it in 15 minutes" Clinton said, referring to a scene in the first episode of the second season. Earlier in the day, Clinton's daughter Chelsea announced that she and husband, Marc Mezvinsky are expecting their first child later this year. As for the benefit concert, the exception often became the rule with performers coming out of their comfort zone to entertain the audience. The show opened with Sting and Spacey sitting at a bar performing a duet of Cole Porter's "Well Did You Evah (What a Swell Party it is)" backed by a huge orchestra. They eventually were joined by James Taylor, who entered the stage wearing a lamp shade on his head. At the end of the number, Sting welcomed everyone and introduced Spacey as President Unger, his "House of Cards" character. After opera singer Renee Fleming did her first selection early in the show, she requested a partner to accompany her on an excerpt from "Don Giovanni," and out came Sting. After accompanying her seamlessly in Italian, Spacey walked out with a giant daffodil in his mouth and joined in. Actor Oscar Isaac of "Inside Llewyn Davis" fame performed a solo acoustic version of Rod Stewart's "Young Turks." And Sting's oldest son, Joe, covered Nirvana's "Smells Like Teen Spirit." Some stayed in their comfort zone. Taylor performed his signature hit, "Fire and Rain," and later covered the Holland-Dozier-Holland classic, "How Sweet It Is (To Be Loved By You.)" Paul Simon did a couple of his own songs, including "Graceland," and "The Boxer," and Dionne Warwick covered some of the Burt Bacharach tunes she helped make famous, including "Walk on By." Stephen Stills brought the crowd to its feet several times with raucous versions of "For What It's Worth," and the finale for the nearly three-hour show, "Love the One You're With," where he was joined by all of the evening's performers. The Rain Forest Foundation Fund is dedicated to preserving rain forests around the world by defending the rights of indigenous people living in and around them. It was founded in 1989 by Sting, Styler, and Jean-Pierre Dutilleux. In her speech, Styler spoke of the global importance of protecting rain forests around the world, and said that she and Sting no longer mind being described as "Tree-hugging tantric yogis." ______ Online: http://www.rainforestfund.org Twitter: Follow AP Entertainment's John Carucci at http://www.twitter.com/jacarucci Copyright (2014) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

From 'Unwrapped' to new TV show 'Rewrapped'
Thursday Apr 17, 2014
From 'Unwrapped' to new TV show 'Rewrapped'

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Consider the simple but beloved chocolate chip cookie. Now imagine that cookie encrusting a brioche roll tucked around a turkey meatball. Or turn your thoughts to a mass-produced cherry pie transformed into an eggroll with dipping sauce. Or the prospect of potato chip soup. Such is the culinary fallout from "Rewrapped," a new Food Network series that builds on the tradition of "Unwrapped," a longtime channel staple that also airs on the Cooking Channel. "Unwrapped," now in reruns, pulls the veil back on how peanut butter, snack cakes, marshmallows and other such items are commercially produced. "Rewrapped," debuting at 8 p.m. EDT Monday and hosted by Joey Fatone, is a competition in which chefs recreate a brand product and then use it in original, sometimes mind-boggling, recipes. The desire to "repurpose" footage from "Unwrapped" led to the new series from producer BSTV Entertainment, according to Marc Summers, a game-show host ("Double Dare") and comedian who leads its three-judge panel. Summers is familiar to Food Network viewers as the host of "Unwrapped," and is a producer whose credits include the channel's "Dinner: Impossible" and "Restaurant: Impossible," which marks its 100th episode on May 7. On "Rewrapped," clips of food production lead into the contest in which three chefs try to match the product's commercial taste and appearance. There can be unexpected challenges, like the smile on Pepperidge Farm's tiny Goldfish crackers. Chefs deftly employed such tools as coat hangers and foil to fashion the grin, Summers said. Points are awarded and carried into round two, which turns up the creative heat with recipes that can be sweet or savory. They also can give a judge pause. "The chefs put these things in front of you and you think, 'Oh, this is not going to be good,'" Summers said. But when he sampled the cookie-meatball-brioche mash-up, he recalled, "Oh, my God, my head exploded. It was fantastic." Is he typically such an open-minded eater? "I have become a bit of a foodie but I'm still not one of those folks who want quail eggs and mustard, or whatever fancy-schmancy stuff folks eat today," he said. ____ Online: http://www.foodnetwork.com Copyright (2014) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Clippers-Warriors series billed as must-see TV
Thursday Apr 17, 2014
Clippers-Warriors series billed as must-see TV

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Forget the Showtime Lakers or the Sacramento Kings of past decades. There's a flashy brand of basketball being played by a new pair of rising California rivals. The alley-oops in Lob City, the deep 3-pointers by the Splash Brothers and the overall bitterness between the Los Angeles Clippers and Golden State Warriors should make for one of the most entertaining matchups in the first round of the NBA playoffs. "As far as a series, it's a 10," said former New York Knicks coach Jeff Van Gundy, who will have a front row seat on the ABC broadcasting team for Game 1 in Los Angeles on Saturday. Whether the high-octane style and 3-point prowess both teams possess can carry either to a championship — this year or in the future — remains to be seen. Those Kings teams, dubbed "The Greatest Show on Court" on a 2001 Sports Illustrated cover, never even made the NBA Finals. Neither did the high-scoring Phoenix Suns with two-time MVP Steve Nash at the point. The "Run TMC" Warriors under the direction of Don Nelson never reached the conference finals. In an age when the pace typically slows down in the playoffs and offenses get bunched in half-court sets, the Clippers and Warriors are trying to speed it up and spread it out. "It will be a fun matchup," Clippers guard Jamal Crawford said. "It's two teams who are both exciting and both love to get up and down the court." The high-flying frontcourt of Blake Griffin and DeAndre Jordan, coupled with point guard Chris Paul and 3-point shooters all over the roster make the Clippers one of the most fan-pleasing spectacles in sports. Los Angeles led the NBA in scoring this season, averaging 107.9 points per game. "Incredible offensive juggernaut," Van Gundy called them. The quick-shooting Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson for Golden State are as dangerous a scoring tandem as the league has ever seen. They combined to make 484 3-pointers this season — eclipsing their NBA record of 483 set last season — and showed in the playoffs a year ago how tough they are to cover when they get going. "The greatest shooting backcourt in NBA history," Warriors coach Mark Jackson has repeatedly labeled them. What both coaches believe separates their teams — and often gets lost in the shoot-first-and-shoot-often approach they employ on offense — is the importance they place on defense. The Warriors held opponents to 43.6 percent shooting, tied with Oklahoma City for third-best in the league — though Golden State's defense could be hampered with center Andrew Bogut out with a fractured right rib. Opponents shot 44.1 percent against the Clippers, ranking fifth. "There's certain teams that you can slow down, and then there's certain teams that they're going to get it going in transition," Jackson said. "The one thing about us is we defend at a high level, which creates transition opportunities." The Clippers and Warriors also have something rare these days: real animosity that could fuel physical play. "They hate one another," said former Indiana Pacers guard and current TNT analyst Reggie Miller. The last major squabble came in Golden State's win on Christmas Day in Oakland, when Griffin and Warriors reserve Draymond Green were ejected and Bogut had dust-ups with Griffin and Paul. Earlier this season, the Clippers even refused to hold pregame chapel with the Warriors in Los Angeles — something every other team does in the league. The verbal accusations heated up again on the air waves this week when Thompson was asked to describe Griffin's tactics. He said the Clippers' All-Star forward is "out of control" and compared him to a "bull in a china shop." "Like how can a guy that big and strong flop that much?" Thompson told KGMZ. There have been several other incidents, of course, including seven technical fouls in the teams' first meeting last season. In the next, the Warriors beat the Clippers by 21 and got more than 300,000 views from a YouTube video that showed the bench jeering Griffin's 3-point attempt that bounced off the side of the backboard. The Clippers came back three days later by overemphasizing celebrations during a 26-point win. "Both organizations were kind of irrelevant for a while when it comes to playoff basketball and playing important games. The last three years it's kind of been a progression to where we are now," Curry said. "You play each other four times a year, sometimes in the preseason, and you understand you'll probably have to go through them at some point to get to where you want to go and the goals you set for yourself. And all that kind of comes out each time you play them." The next phase in that evolution is a playoff series and, for the one surviving team, a chance to make the kind of deep run both franchises have long lacked. The teams have been in the Pacific Division since 1978, when the Clippers played in San Diego. They have never met in the playoffs — until now. "I think to really develop a great rivalry, there has to be incidents and there has to be meetings in the playoffs in close proximity," said Van Gundy, whose Knicks teams produced one of the best rivalries in NBA history against Miami in the 1990s. "With Miami, we had a few things in games, little flare-ups, and then we met four straight years in the playoffs and they all went to a deciding game. You need those things to develop rivalries." ___ AP Sports Writer Anne M. Peterson in Portland, Ore., contributed to this story. ___ Antonio Gonzalez can be reached at: www.twitter.com/agonzalezAP Copyright (2014) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Movies

Man details abuse claims against 'X-Men' director
Thursday Apr 17, 2014
Man details abuse claims against 'X-Men' director

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A man who claims he was sexually abused by "X-Men" franchise director Bryan Singer said Thursday that he reported the molestation to authorities at the time, and he does not know why charges were never pursued. With his voice occasionally wavering, Michael Egan III described abuse he said began when he was 15 years old at the hands of Singer and others. He told of being plied with drugs and promises of Hollywood fame while also enduring threats and sexual abuse in Hawaii and Los Angeles over several years. "You were a piece of meat," Egan said of how he and other teenage boys were viewed at the home where he claims Singer abused him. Signer's attorney Marty Singer wrote in a statement after Egan's remarks that the accusations were "completely fabricated." Egan sued Singer in Hawaii on Wednesday and is seeking more than $75,000 on each of four accusations: intentional infliction of emotional distress, battery, assault and invasion of privacy. Egan and his attorney said at a news conference that the alleged abuse was reported by Egan's mother to the FBI and Los Angeles police and that interviews were conducted. The lawyer, Jeff Herman, later said he was not sure if his client spoke to police detectives or if the case was referred directly to the FBI. He said Egan did not report any abuse to Hawaiian authorities. Los Angeles Police Commander Andrew Smith said the department is looking into whether a report was made. FBI spokeswoman Laura Eimiller said the agency could not comment on what Egan reported unless it resulted in a case or matter of public record. "However, the suggestion that the FBI ignored a minor victim, or evidence involving the sexual victimization of a child, is ludicrous," Eimiller said. "The FBI vigorously pursues all allegations involving the sexual abuse of minors and pursues prosecution when evidence of such crimes is brought to its attention." Singer's attorney has called the lawsuit's claims absurd and defamatory. "We look forward to our bringing a claim for malicious prosecution against Mr. Egan and his attorney after we prevail," Marty Singer's wrote Thursday. He accused Egan's attorney of seeking fame by calling a news conference to discuss the lawsuit. "It is obvious that plaintiff's attorney is not looking to litigate the case on its merits," Marty Singer, who is not related to Bryan Singer, wrote. Singer is the director of the upcoming film "X-Men: Days of Future Past" and directed previous films in the franchise, as well as the thriller "The Usual Suspects." "These are serious allegations, and they will be resolved in the appropriate forum," 20th Century Fox, the distributor of Singer's latest film, wrote in a statement. "This is a personal matter, which Bryan Singer and his representatives are addressing separately." The Associated Press does not typically name victims of sex abuse, but it is naming Egan because he is speaking publicly about his allegations. The lawsuit was filed in Hawaii, and is possible because of a state law that temporarily suspends the statute of limitations in sex-abuse cases. Herman said Thursday that he planned to file additional lawsuits in Hawaii against other Hollywood figures he said were responsible for abusing underage teenagers. The attorney would not say who else he planned to sue. The lawsuit claims Egan was lured into a sex ring run by a former digital entertainment company executive, Marc Collins-Rector, with promises of auditions for acting, modeling and commercial jobs. He was put on the company's payroll as an actor, but forced to have sex with adult men at parties within Hollywood's entertainment industry, the lawsuit said. Collins-Rector pleaded guilty in 2004 to transporting five minors across state lines to have sex with them. Phone numbers listed for Collins-Rector have been disconnected and attempts to reach him for comment Thursday failed. Records maintained in Florida, where Collins-Rector is required to register as a sex offender, show that in 2008 his last known address was in the Dominican Republic. Bryan Singer attended several of the parties and forced Egan into sex, giving him drugs and threatening Egan when he resisted advances, the lawsuit states. Egan said he spent several years masking his pain by drinking. He stopped drinking within the last year, entered therapy and sought out a lawyer who would pursue a case against the director. "I hope to help a lot of other people," Egan said. "No one at a young age ever deserves to go through the horrific junk I went through as a kid." Los Angeles court records show that Michael Egan and two other men sued Collins-Rector in 2000 and were granted a default judgment the following year. The case file was not available Thursday. Egan could not explain why his attorney at the time didn't include Singer in that case. Herman has made a career of representing victims of sex abuse, filing lawsuits against organizations such as the Roman Catholic Church and Boy Scouts of America. In 2011, Herman won a $100 million verdict against a Catholic priest who was accused of molesting dozens of boys. ___ Anthony McCartney can be reached at http://twitter.com/mccartneyAP. Oskar Garcia, who reported from Honolulu, can be reached on Twitter at http://twitter.com/oskargarcia Copyright (2014) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Review: 'Act One' is a sweet ode to the theater
Thursday Apr 17, 2014
Review: 'Act One' is a sweet ode to the theater

NEW YORK (AP) — What's happening now at the Vivian Beaumont Theater was inevitable, really. Lincoln Center Theater has turned Moss Hart's cracking memoir "Act One" into a rollicking play, which, if you think about it, is the natural medium for a man who lived and breathed the theater, what he called "a lifelong infection." Hart was a Broadway giant during the 1930s-'50s, directing "My Fair Lady" and "Camelot" and collaborating with George S. Kaufman on such hits as "The Man Who Came to Dinner" and "You Can't Take It With You." It makes perfect sense that his autobiography is onstage. And no less a modern theater icon than James Lapine has adapted and directed the play, using the stage thrillingly in a way the book could not. The sweet "Act One," which opened Thursday at the Vivian Beaumont Theater, faithfully and chronologically charts Hart's rise from poverty in the Bronx to co-writing with Kaufman "Once In a Lifetime" in 1930, his first Broadway hit. But it's of course more than that: The majority of the 22 actors play multiple parts, jumping in and out of characters and costumes while the bold, complex set by Beowulf Boritt spins and spins. So in its very fiber and execution, it's a celebration of the theater itself. It takes no less than three people to portray Hart — Matthew Schechter as a theater-loving boy, Santino Fontana as the playwright on the verge of fame, and Tony Shalhoub looking back. Most of the key moments in the book are here: Hart's hardscrabble childhood, his influential theater-loving Aunt Kate, his first job as a messenger boy, his first Broadway flop, becoming an actor and then teaming up with Kaufman. The second act, concentrated on the tortured path of "Once In a Lifetime," goes down better than a slightly sluggish first, which is necessarily weighed down by background. Fontana and Shalhoub, who eerily begin to resemble each other by the end of the show, have the hardest jobs. Fontana brings his huge charm and energy, his excitement at having a life in the theater infectious. Shalhoub, who plays Hart's stern father and then the oddball Kaufman, doesn't get much chance to rest. Both don't need a gym membership this spring with this much racing around, up and down steps. Andrea Martin is great as the proud and stubborn Aunt Kate and then plays Kaufman's gracious wife. Chuck Cooper's parts include the frustrated actor Charles Gilpin — though there's no scene in which a drunken Gilpin and Hart play "The Emperor Jones," which in the book was naturally theatrical — and Max Siegel, a general manager. Lapine manages to keep all these moving pieces going at a healthy clip while also adding what was missing from the book: scenes from Hart's actual plays. In one excellently realized scene, Hart and Kaufman are brainstorming about a moment in "Once In a Lifetime" and the actors in it change their dialogue as the writers edit and rewrite. Lapine has kept many of the lines that made Hart's book so much fun ("The theater is not so much a profession as a disease" and "A collaboration is like a marriage — nothing anyone tells you about it is of any real use.") He comes close to maudlin when the ghostly Aunt Kate reappears or when Moss' father finally gives him a hug, but pulls back just in time. But audience-members who haven't read the book may be puzzled by some things: Why is Hart always so hungry while working with Kaufman? Or why Hart feels the need to destroy the room he and his family were renting? And those who have read the book will feel cheated they never got to see the elaborate and hyped set for the nightclub Pigeon's Egg. Boritt's revolving three-story set spins like a globe that contains apartments, offices, bars and a large theater stage. It has staircases, tenements, grand ballrooms and Broadway marquees. It defies logic. It's like a M.C. Escher painting come to life. This is ultimately a valentine to the theater and the poor folk who work so hard at it. It's also a celebration of a remarkable man, whose stories sometimes seem too good to be true. And he knows it: "Let's face it," Hart winkingly tells us in Act 1, "life often imitates bad plays." But this is a good play that does his life justice. ___ Mark Kennedy is at http://twitter.com/KennedyTwits ___ Online: http://www.lct.org Copyright (2014) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Days after shooting, 'Virunga' debuts at Tribeca
Thursday Apr 17, 2014
Days after shooting, 'Virunga' debuts at Tribeca

NEW YORK (AP) — Days after the director of Africa's oldest national park was shot by gunmen, a documentary about those who protect Virunga National Park from armed poachers and encroaching oil interests premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival. The debut Thursday night of "Virunga," named after the eastern Congo park, followed the shooting Tuesday of Emmanuel de Merode, the chief warden of Virunga. He is in serious but stable condition after being attacked by three gunmen while driving through the park. De Merode, a Belgian royal, appears extensively in the documentary, which provides a striking portrait of the violence surrounding the majestic park and its dauntless defenders. Directed by British filmmaker Orlando von Einsiedel, "Virunga" depicts the desperate struggle by de Merode and the park rangers to protect the park and its wildlife from armed militias, rebels and an oil company. "It's obviously very tragic what's happened, but a lot of people have taken interest in this. It's helped to magnify things," said von Einsiedel, who has been in frequent contact with De Merode while he recovers from gunshot wounds to his abdomen. "Emmanuel is very conscious of that, too. He's like, 'I'm getting better. Now let's go make a lot of noise about what's happening,'" von Einsiedel said. The Congolese government has authorized oil exploration in the park by London-based SOCO, following the discovery of oil in 2010. The World Wildlife Fund has protested the legality of that decision. Virunga is a World Heritage site listed by UNESCO as "in danger." The park is best known as home to about a quarter of the world's estimated 800 remaining mountain gorillas. It's the only place on Earth were one can see all three African great apes. The park includes the snowcapped Rwenzoria mountains, seven volcanoes, a lake and plains filled with wildlife. "This is a British company operating illegally in a World Heritage site," said von Einsiedel. "There's like .05 percent of the world's surface is a World Heritage site. If we can't protect those, what does it say for the Great Barrier Reef, for Yellowstone, for Yosemite?" In meetings filmed with hidden cameras, "Virunga" shows local SOCO supporters attempting to bribe park workers to circumvent de Merode, arguing that "he's the one hindering the process." French freelance journalist Melanie Gouby captures a French SOCO operations manager saying the best solution is to "recolonize these countries." Another encounter shows a security contractor for SOCO paying out a bribe. In an interview hours before the film premiered at Tribeca, von Einsiedel was plainly nervous that SOCO could interfere with the release of the film. "They are an incredibly powerful company," he said. "We stand by our journalism on this film. We are small filmmakers; they are a billion dollar oil company. On a personal level, that concerns us. Of course, we're much more concerned about what they're doing in the region." SOCO has condemned the attack on de Merode. Human Rights Watch on Thursday called for Congolese authorities to "take immediate steps to ensure a safe environment for those seeking to uphold the law, protect the park and peacefully express their views." "It makes it real for all of us how high the stakes are and how much people are taking risks to defend that park," said Gouby, a former reporter for The Associated Press. Park spokeswoman Joanna Natasegara said Wednesday that more than 140 rangers have been killed on the job in the past 10 years. "Virunga" is dedicated to them. The documentary includes combat footage with heavy shelling when a rebel group overruns the villages near the park. Yet de Merode mostly lives in nothing more protective than a tent. While making the film, von Einsiedel lived a few tents down from the warden. "You don't really have a choice, to be honest," said von Einsiedel, laughing. The film will hope to pick up a distribution deal at Tribeca, but that's a smaller goal for "Virunga." "Right now, it's about making noise and sharing this story with the world and exposing what's happening there," von Einsidel said. "It's a campaign film. It's part of a much bigger campaign." ___ Online: http://virungamovie.com ___ Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jake_coyle Copyright (2014) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Williams in talks to reprise 'Mrs. Doubtfire' role
Thursday Apr 17, 2014
Williams in talks to reprise 'Mrs. Doubtfire' role

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Fox 2000 is developing the sequel to the 1993 hit comedy "Mrs. Doubtfire," which starred Robin Williams. The follow-up will be penned by "Elf" writer David Berenbaum, the studio's spokeswoman, Chelsey Summey, confirmed on Thursday. While no deals are in place yet, Williams and Chris Columbus are in talks to join the production, Summey said. The 62-year-old Williams would reprise his role as Mrs. Doubtfire, and Columbus would be back to direct and produce with his company 1492. Williams starred in "Mrs. Doubtfire" as struggling actor Daniel Hillard, a father of three who disguised himself as Scottish nanny Mrs. Doubtfire to spend time with his kids. The former wife of Williams' Daniel was played by Sally Field. Pierce Brosnan also starred. The original film made over $400 million worldwide. Copyright (2014) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Trailer: Eli Roth drags viewers into 'The Green Inferno'
Thursday Apr 17, 2014
Trailer: Eli Roth drags viewers into 'The Green Inferno'

A disturbing new video sets the tone for this horror feature on cannibalism.Presented at festivals in late 2013, namely in Toronto and Rome, "The Green Inferno" has made its first appearance on the internet in a one-minute teaser premiered exclusively by AOL. Known for his twisted horror movies "Cabin Fever" and "Hostel," director Eli Roth succeeds in creating a tense and cruel atmosphere in this sequence taken from his next film. The feature follows a group of somewhat naive students with a penchant for green activism who head into the Amazon to meet a tribe threatened with being wiped out. Things quickly get ugly, as the natives turn out to be vicious cannibals. A tribute to the 1980 film "Cannibal Holocaust," "The Green Inferno" will arrive in US theaters on September 5. Watch the teaser for "The Green Inferno": on.aol.com/video/the-green-inferno---trailer-no--1-518197296  Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2014.

Events

Kim Novak speaks out against Oscar night 'bullies'
Friday Apr 18, 2014
Kim Novak speaks out against Oscar night 'bullies'

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Kim Novak says that cruel jabs about how she looked during the Oscar ceremony amounted to bullying that left her crushed at first, but then determined to speak out in protest. "It really did throw me into a tailspin and it hit me hard," Novak, 81, said in a telephone interview Thursday, after she released an open letter condemning remarks by Donald Trump and others about her appearance. In her letter, Novak said: "I will no longer hold myself back from speaking out against bullies. We can't let people get away with affecting our lives." She had initially remained silent after serving as a presenter with Matthew McConaughey at the March 2 Academy Awards because the comments were so painful, Novak said from her home near the Rogue River in Oregon. "For days, I didn't leave the house, and it got to me like it gets kids and teenagers" who are attacked, she said. Trump tweeted during the Oscars that Novak should "sue her plastic surgeon," while others noted how unnaturally smooth-faced the veteran star of "Vertigo" and other classic films looked — even though actresses are pressured to look forever young. "I'm not going to deny that I had fat injections in my face. They seemed far less invasive than a face lift," Novak wrote in her letter, adding, "In my opinion, a person has a right to look as good as they can, and I feel better when I look better." Novak's Oscar night speech, which some observers characterized as halting, was the result of a pill she had taken to relax and a three-day fast, she said in her letter. Novak wasn't the only older actress targeted at the Oscars. She was disturbed, she said, when ceremony host Ellen DeGeneres singled out audience member Liza Minnelli, 68, and pretended to mistake her for a male impersonator. "Good job, sir," DeGeneres said. Novak said she retains dark memories of her years as a young actress in Hollywood, when she suffered from untreated bipolar disorder and was acutely sensitive to the industry's casual snideness and harsh reviews of her lesser films. But the Oscar sniping took her aback, Novak said, because she had been given such a gracious welcome during a visit last year to Cannes, France, and gets warm notes from fans. "I thought, 'Perhaps Hollywood is ready to receive me in a different way.' I was just not prepared for such a negative reaction and it just caught me off guard," she said. Comments spread fast and far online, she said, and people don't realize you're listening. "It goes over in such a public way now," she said. It was a commitment to appear at the TCM Film Festival last week that changed her mind about going public with her concerns. Novak, an artist with an upcoming exhibit at the Butler Institute of American Art in Ohio, also showed one of her works, a "Vertigo"-related painting, at the festival. She was well received during her initial appearance but felt she had to "take the bull by the horns" and deal openly with the treatment of her and Minnelli, she said. Turner Classic Movies host Robert Osborne agreed to discuss it during an interview that preceded a festival screening Saturday of her film "Bell, Book and Candle." Novak, who said she takes medication for her disorder, decided afterward that she wanted to spread her message more widely and asked her longtime manager, Sue Cameron, to release the letter. "I realized that I had to stand up not only for myself but for other people that don't have the courage to do so," Novak said. "I feel like I have a mission." ___ Online: http://www.kimnovakartist.com Copyright (2014) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Garcia Marquez, Nobel laureate, dies at 87
Thursday Apr 17, 2014
Garcia Marquez, Nobel laureate, dies at 87

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez crafted intoxicating fiction from the fatalism, fantasy, cruelty and heroics of the world that set his mind churning as a child growing up on Colombia's Caribbean coast. One of the most revered and influential writers of his generation, he brought Latin America's charm and maddening contradictions to life in the minds of millions and became the best-known practitioner of "magical realism," a blending of fantastic elements into portrayals of daily life that made the extraordinary seem almost routine. In his works, clouds of yellow butterflies precede a forbidden lover's arrival. A heroic liberator of nations dies alone, destitute and far from home. "A Very Old Man With Enormous Wings," as one of his short stories is called, is spotted in a muddy courtyard. Garcia Marquez's own epic story ended Thursday, at age 87, with his death at his home in southern Mexico City, according to two people close to the family who spoke on condition of anonymity out of respect for the family's privacy. Known to millions simply as "Gabo," Garcia Marquez was widely seen as the Spanish language's most popular writer since Miguel de Cervantes in the 17th century. His extraordinary literary celebrity spawned comparisons with Mark Twain and Charles Dickens. His flamboyant and melancholy works — among them "Chronicle of a Death Foretold," ''Love in the Time of Cholera" and "Autumn of the Patriarch" — outsold everything published in Spanish except the Bible. The epic 1967 novel "One Hundred Years of Solitude" sold more than 50 million copies in more than 25 languages. With writers including Norman Mailer and Tom Wolfe, Garcia Marquez was also an early practitioner of the literary nonfiction that would become known as New Journalism. He became an elder statesman of Latin American journalism, with magisterial works of narrative non-fiction that included the "Story of A Shipwrecked Sailor," the tale of a seaman lost on a life raft for 10 days. He was also a scion of the region's left. Shorter pieces dealt with subjects including Venezuela's larger-than-life president, Hugo Chavez, while the book "News of a Kidnapping" vividly portrayed how cocaine traffickers led by Pablo Escobar had shred the social and moral fabric of his native Colombia, kidnapping members of its elite. In 1994, Garcia Marquez founded the Iberoamerican Foundation for New Journalism, which offers training and competitions to raise the standard of narrative and investigative journalism across Latin America. But for so many inside and outside the region, it was his novels that became synonymous with Latin America itself. When he accepted the Nobel prize in 1982, Garcia Marquez described the region as a "source of insatiable creativity, full of sorrow and beauty, of which this roving and nostalgic Colombian is but one cipher more, singled out by fortune. Poets and beggars, musicians and prophets, warriors and scoundrels, all creatures of that unbridled reality, we have had to ask but little of imagination, for our crucial problem has been a lack of conventional means to render our lives believable." Gerald Martin, Garcia Marquez's semi-official biographer, told The Associated Press that "One Hundred Years of Solitude" was "the first novel in which Latin Americans recognized themselves, that defined them, celebrated their passion, their intensity, their spirituality and superstition, their grand propensity for failure." The Spanish Royal Academy, the arbiter of the language, celebrated the novel's 40th anniversary with a special edition. It had only done so for just one other book, Cervantes' "Don Quijote." Like many Latin American writers, Garcia Marquez transcended the world of letters. He became a hero to the Latin American left as an early ally of Cuba's revolutionary leader Fidel Castro and a critic of Washington's interventions from Vietnam to Chile. His affable visage, set off by a white mustache and bushy grey eyebrows, was instantly recognizable. Unable to receive a U.S. visa for years due to his politics, he was nonetheless courted by presidents and kings. He counted Bill Clinton and Francois Mitterrand among his presidential friends. Garcia Marquez was born in Aracataca, a small Colombian town near the Caribbean coast on March 6, 1927. He was the eldest of the 11 children of Luisa Santiaga Marquez and Gabriel Elijio Garcia, a telegraphist and a wandering homeopathic pharmacist who fathered at least four children outside of his marriage. Just after their first son was born, his parents left him with his maternal grandparents and moved to Barranquilla, where Garcia Marquez's father opened the first of a series of homeopathic pharmacies that would invariably fail, leaving them barely able to make ends meet. Garcia Marquez was raised for 10 years by his grandmother and his grandfather, a retired colonel who fought in the devastating 1,000-Day War that hastened Colombia's loss of the Panamanian isthmus. His grandparents' tales would provide grist for Garcia Marquez's fiction and Aracataca became the model for Macondo, the village surrounded by banana plantations at the foot of the Sierra Nevada mountains where "One Hundred Years of Solitude" is set. "I have often been told by the family that I started recounting things, stories and so on, almost since I was born," Garcia Marquez once told an interviewer. "Ever since I could speak." Garcia Marquez's parents continued to have children, and barely made ends meet. Their first-born son was sent to a state-run boarding school just outside Bogota where he became a star student and voracious reader, favoring Hemingway, Faulkner, Dostoevsky and Kafka. Garcia Marquez published his first piece of fiction as a student in 1947, mailing a short story to the newspaper El Espectador after its literary editor wrote that "Colombia's younger generation has nothing to offer in the way of good literature anymore." His father insisted he study law but he dropped out, bored, and dedicated himself to journalism. The pay was atrocious and Garcia Marquez recalled his mother visiting him in Bogota and commenting in horror at his bedraggled appearance that: "I thought you were a beggar." Garcia Marquez wrote in 1955 about a sailor, washed off the deck of a Colombian warship during a storm, who reappeared weeks later at the village church where his family was offering a Mass for his soul. "The Story of a Shipwrecked Sailor" uncovered that the destroyer was carrying cargo, the cargo was contraband, and the vessel was overloaded. The authorities didn't like it," Garcia Marquez recalled. Several months later, while he was in Europe, dictator Gustavo Rojas Pinilla's government closed El Espectador. In exile, he toured the Soviet-controlled east, he moved to Rome in 1955 to study cinema, a lifelong love. Then he moved to Paris, where he lived among intellectuals and artists exiled from the many Latin American dictatorships of the day. Garcia Marquez returned to Colombia in 1958 to marry Mercedes Barcha, a neighbor from childhood days. They had two sons, Rodrigo, a film director, and Gonzalo, a graphic designer. Garcia Marquez's writing was constantly informed by his leftist political views, themselves forged in large part by a 1928 military massacre near Aracataca of banana workers striking against the United Fruit Company, which later became Chiquita. He was also greatly influenced by the assassination two decades later of Jorge Eliecer Gaitan, a galvanizing leftist presidential candidate. The killing would set off the "Bogotazo," a weeklong riot that destroyed the center of Colombia's capital and which Castro, a visiting student activist, also lived through. Garcia Marquez would sign on to the young Cuban revolution as a journalist, working in Bogota and Havana for its news agency Prensa Latina, then later as the agency's correspondent in New York. Garcia Marquez wrote the epic "One Hundred Years of Solitude" in 18 months, living first off loans from friends and then by having his wife pawn their things, starting with the car and furniture. By the time he finished writing in September 1966, their belongings had dwindled to an electric heater, a blender and a hairdryer. His wife then pawned those remaining items so that he could mail the manuscript to a publisher in Argentina. "I never made a copy — that was the only one there was," he recalled. When Garcia Marquez came home from the post office, his wife looked around and said, "We have no furniture left, we have nothing. We owe $5,000." She need not have worried; all 8,000 copies of the first run sold out in a week. President Clinton himself recalled in an AP interview in 2007 reading "One Hundred Years of Solitude" while in law school and not being able to put it down, not even during classes. "I realized this man had imagined something that seemed like a fantasy but was profoundly true and profoundly wise," he said. Garcia Marquez remained loyal to Castro even as other intellectuals lost patience with the Cuban leader's intolerance for dissent. The U.S. writer Susan Sontag accused Garcia Marquez in 2005 of complicity by association in Cuban human rights violations. But others defended him, saying Garcia Marquez had persuaded Castro to help secure freedom for political prisoners. Garcia Marquez's politics caused the United States to deny him entry visas for years. After a 1981 run-in with Colombia's government in which he was accused of sympathizing with M-19 rebels and sending money to a Venezuelan guerrilla group, he moved to Mexico City, where he lived most of the time for the rest of this life. A bon vivant with an impish personality, Garcia Marquez was a gracious host who would animatedly recount long stories to guests, and occasionally unleash a quick temper when he felt slighted or misrepresented by the press. Martin, the biographer, said the writer's penchant for embellishment often extended to his recounting of stories from his own life. From childhood on, wrote Martin, "Garcia Marquez would have trouble with other people's questioning of his veracity." Garcia Marquez turned down offers of diplomatic posts and spurned attempts to draft him to run for Colombia's presidency, though he did get involved in behind-the-scenes peace mediation efforts between Colombia's government and leftist rebels. In 1998, already in his 70s, Garcia Marquez fulfilled a lifelong dream, buying a majority interest in the Colombian newsmagazine Cambio with money from his Nobel award. "I'm a journalist. I've always been a journalist," he told the AP at the time. "My books couldn't have been written if I weren't a journalist because all the material was taken from reality." Before falling ill with lymphatic cancer in June 1999, the author contributed prodigiously to the magazine, including one article that denounced what he considered the unfair political persecution of Clinton for sexual adventures. Garcia Marquez's memory began to fail as he entered his 80s, friends said. His last book, "Memories of My Melancholy Whores," was published in 2004. He is survived by his wife, his two sons, Rodrigo, a film director, and Gonzalo, a graphic designer, seven brothers and sisters and one half-sister. _____ Associated Press writer Frank Bajak contributed to this report from Lima. Paul Haven and Michael Weissenstein in Mexico City contributed. Copyright (2014) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Nobel laureate, dies at 87
Thursday Apr 17, 2014
Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Nobel laureate, dies at 87

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez crafted intoxicating fiction from the fatalism, fantasy, cruelty and heroics of the world that set his mind churning as a child growing up on Colombia's Caribbean coast. One of the most revered and influential writers of his generation, he brought Latin America's charm and maddening contradictions to life in the minds of millions and became the best-known practitioner of "magical realism," a blending of fantastic elements into portrayals of daily life that made the extraordinary seem almost routine. In his works, clouds of yellow butterflies precede a forbidden lover's arrival. A heroic liberator of nations dies alone, destitute and far from home. "A Very Old Man With Enormous Wings," as one of his short stories is called, is spotted in a muddy courtyard. Garcia Marquez's own epic story ended Thursday, at age 87, with his death at his home in southern Mexico City, according to two people close to the family who spoke on condition of anonymity out of respect for the family's privacy. Known to millions simply as "Gabo," Garcia Marquez was widely seen as the Spanish language's most popular writer since Miguel de Cervantes in the 17th century. His extraordinary literary celebrity spawned comparisons with Mark Twain and Charles Dickens. "A thousand years of solitude and sadness because of the death of the greatest Colombian of all time!" Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos said on Twitter. "Such giants never die." His flamboyant and melancholy works — among them "Chronicle of a Death Foretold," ''Love in the Time of Cholera" and "Autumn of the Patriarch" — outsold everything published in Spanish except the Bible. The epic 1967 novel "One Hundred Years of Solitude" sold more than 50 million copies in more than 25 languages. The first sentence of "One Hundred Years of Solitude" has become one of the most famous opening lines of all time: "Many years later, as he faced the firing squad, Colonel Aureliano Buendia was to remember that distant afternoon when his father took him to discover ice." With writers including Norman Mailer and Tom Wolfe, Garcia Marquez was also an early practitioner of the literary nonfiction that would become known as New Journalism. He became an elder statesman of Latin American journalism, with magisterial works of narrative non-fiction that included the "Story of A Shipwrecked Sailor," the tale of a seaman lost on a life raft for 10 days. He was also a scion of the region's left. Shorter pieces dealt with subjects including Venezuela's larger-than-life president, Hugo Chavez, while the book "News of a Kidnapping" vividly portrayed how cocaine traffickers led by Pablo Escobar had shred the social and moral fabric of his native Colombia, kidnapping members of its elite. In 1994, Garcia Marquez founded the Iberoamerican Foundation for New Journalism, which offers training and competitions to raise the standard of narrative and investigative journalism across Latin America. But for so many inside and outside the region, it was his novels that became synonymous with Latin America itself. "The world has lost one of its greatest visionary writers — and one of my favorites from the time I was young," President Barack Obama said. When he accepted the Nobel prize in 1982, Garcia Marquez described the region as a "source of insatiable creativity, full of sorrow and beauty, of which this roving and nostalgic Colombian is but one cipher more, singled out by fortune. Poets and beggars, musicians and prophets, warriors and scoundrels, all creatures of that unbridled reality, we have had to ask but little of imagination, for our crucial problem has been a lack of conventional means to render our lives believable." Gerald Martin, Garcia Marquez's semi-official biographer, told The Associated Press that "One Hundred Years of Solitude" was "the first novel in which Latin Americans recognized themselves, that defined them, celebrated their passion, their intensity, their spirituality and superstition, their grand propensity for failure." The Spanish Royal Academy, the arbiter of the language, celebrated the novel's 40th anniversary with a special edition. It had only done so for just one other book, Cervantes' "Don Quijote." Like many Latin American writers, Garcia Marquez transcended the world of letters. He became a hero to the Latin American left as an early ally of Cuba's revolutionary leader Fidel Castro and a critic of Washington's interventions from Vietnam to Chile. His affable visage, set off by a white mustache and bushy grey eyebrows, was instantly recognizable. Unable to receive a U.S. visa for years due to his politics, he was nonetheless courted by presidents and kings. He counted Bill Clinton and Francois Mitterrand among his presidential friends. "From the time I read 'One Hundred Years of Solitude' more than 40 years ago, I was always amazed by his unique gifts of imagination, clarity of thought, and emotional honesty," Clinton said Thursday. "I was honored to be his friend and to know his great heart and brilliant mind for more than 20 years." Garcia Marquez was born in Aracataca, a small Colombian town near the Caribbean coast on March 6, 1927. He was the eldest of the 11 children of Luisa Santiaga Marquez and Gabriel Elijio Garcia, a telegraphist and a wandering homeopathic pharmacist who fathered at least four children outside of his marriage. Just after their first son was born, his parents left him with his maternal grandparents and moved to Barranquilla, where Garcia Marquez's father opened the first of a series of homeopathic pharmacies that would invariably fail, leaving them barely able to make ends meet. Garcia Marquez was raised for 10 years by his grandmother and his grandfather, a retired colonel who fought in the devastating 1,000-Day War that hastened Colombia's loss of the Panamanian isthmus. His grandparents' tales would provide grist for Garcia Marquez's fiction and Aracataca became the model for Macondo, the village surrounded by banana plantations at the foot of the Sierra Nevada mountains where "One Hundred Years of Solitude" is set. "I have often been told by the family that I started recounting things, stories and so on, almost since I was born," Garcia Marquez once told an interviewer. "Ever since I could speak." Garcia Marquez's parents continued to have children, and barely made ends meet. Their first-born son was sent to a state-run boarding school just outside Bogota where he became a star student and voracious reader, favoring Hemingway, Faulkner, Dostoevsky and Kafka. Garcia Marquez published his first piece of fiction as a student in 1947, mailing a short story to the newspaper El Espectador after its literary editor wrote that "Colombia's younger generation has nothing to offer in the way of good literature anymore." His father insisted he study law but he dropped out, bored, and dedicated himself to journalism. The pay was atrocious and Garcia Marquez recalled his mother visiting him in Bogota and commenting in horror at his bedraggled appearance that: "I thought you were a beggar." Garcia Marquez wrote in 1955 about a sailor, washed off the deck of a Colombian warship during a storm, who reappeared weeks later at the village church where his family was offering a Mass for his soul. "The Story of a Shipwrecked Sailor" uncovered that the destroyer was carrying cargo, the cargo was contraband, and the vessel was overloaded. The authorities didn't like it," Garcia Marquez recalled. Several months later, while he was in Europe, dictator Gustavo Rojas Pinilla's government closed El Espectador. In exile, he toured the Soviet-controlled east, he moved to Rome in 1955 to study cinema, a lifelong love. Then he moved to Paris, where he lived among intellectuals and artists exiled from the many Latin American dictatorships of the day. Garcia Marquez returned to Colombia in 1958 to marry Mercedes Barcha, a neighbor from childhood days. They had two sons, Rodrigo, a film director, and Gonzalo, a graphic designer. Garcia Marquez's writing was constantly informed by his leftist political views, themselves forged in large part by a 1928 military massacre near Aracataca of banana workers striking against the United Fruit Company, which later became Chiquita. He was also greatly influenced by the assassination two decades later of Jorge Eliecer Gaitan, a galvanizing leftist presidential candidate. The killing would set off the "Bogotazo," a weeklong riot that destroyed the center of Colombia's capital and which Castro, a visiting student activist, also lived through. Garcia Marquez would sign on to the young Cuban revolution as a journalist, working in Bogota and Havana for its news agency Prensa Latina, then later as the agency's correspondent in New York. Garcia Marquez wrote the epic "One Hundred Years of Solitude" in 18 months, living first off loans from friends and then by having his wife pawn their things, starting with the car and furniture. By the time he finished writing in September 1966, their belongings had dwindled to an electric heater, a blender and a hairdryer. His wife then pawned those remaining items so that he could mail the manuscript to a publisher in Argentina. When Garcia Marquez came home from the post office, his wife looked around and said, "We have no furniture left, we have nothing. We owe $5,000." She need not have worried; all 8,000 copies of the first run sold out in a week. President Clinton himself recalled in an AP interview in 2007 reading "One Hundred Years of Solitude" while in law school and not being able to put it down, not even during classes. "I realized this man had imagined something that seemed like a fantasy but was profoundly true and profoundly wise," he said. Garcia Marquez remained loyal to Castro even as other intellectuals lost patience with the Cuban leader's intolerance for dissent. The U.S. writer Susan Sontag accused Garcia Marquez in 2005 of complicity by association in Cuban human rights violations. But others defended him, saying Garcia Marquez had persuaded Castro to help secure freedom for political prisoners. Garcia Marquez's politics caused the United States to deny him entry visas for years. After a 1981 run-in with Colombia's government in which he was accused of sympathizing with M-19 rebels and sending money to a Venezuelan guerrilla group, he moved to Mexico City, where he lived most of the time for the rest of this life. Garcia Marquez famously feuded with Peruvian author Mario Vargas Llosa, who punched Garcia Marquez in a 1976 fight outside a Mexico City movie theater. Neither man ever publicly discussed the reason for the fight. "A great man has died, one whose works gave the literature of our language great reach and prestige," Vargas Llosa said Thursday. His voice shaking, face hidden behind sunglasses and a baseball cap, Vargas Llosa said Garcia Marquez's "novels will survive him and keep gaining readers around the world." A bon vivant with an impish personality, Garcia Marquez was a gracious host who would animatedly recount long stories to guests, and occasionally unleash a quick temper when he felt slighted or misrepresented by the press. Martin, the biographer, said the writer's penchant for embellishment often extended to his recounting of stories from his own life. From childhood on, wrote Martin, "Garcia Marquez would have trouble with other people's questioning of his veracity." Garcia Marquez turned down offers of diplomatic posts and spurned attempts to draft him to run for Colombia's presidency, though he did get involved in behind-the-scenes peace mediation efforts between Colombia's government and leftist rebels. In 1998, already in his 70s, Garcia Marquez fulfilled a lifelong dream, buying a majority interest in the Colombian newsmagazine Cambio with money from his Nobel award. "I'm a journalist. I've always been a journalist," he told the AP at the time. "My books couldn't have been written if I weren't a journalist because all the material was taken from reality." Before falling ill with lymphatic cancer in June 1999, the author contributed prodigiously to the magazine, including one article that denounced what he considered the unfair political persecution of Clinton for sexual adventures. Garcia Marquez's memory began to fail as he entered his 80s, friends said. His last book, "Memories of My Melancholy Whores," was published in 2004. He is survived by his wife, his two sons, Rodrigo, a film director, and Gonzalo, a graphic designer, seven brothers and sisters and one half-sister. His family said late Thursday that his remains will be cremated and a private ceremony held. _____ Associated Press writer Frank Bajak reported from Lima, Peru. Paul Haven and Michael Weissenstein in Mexico City contributed. Copyright (2014) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

87th Annual Academy Awards date set for Feb. 22
Thursday Apr 17, 2014
87th Annual Academy Awards date set for Feb. 22

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The 87th annual Academy Awards will air live beginning at 8:30 p.m. EST from the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles on ABC on Sunday, Feb. 22. The date, announced on Thursday by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, marks the academy's return to their standard pattern after pushing the show back to March 2 this year because of the Olympics. 2015 Oscar nominees will be announced on Thursday, Jan. 15, which follows the academy's recent plan. 2014 nominations were announced Jan. 16. Voting for the 2015 nominees will begin on Dec. 29, 2014 and end on Jan. 8, 2015. The Academy Awards' annual luncheon for nominees is set for Feb. 2, 2015. Final Oscars voting will commence on Feb. 6, 2015. Voting will end Feb. 17. Copyright (2014) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

From 'Unwrapped' to new TV show 'Rewrapped'
Thursday Apr 17, 2014
From 'Unwrapped' to new TV show 'Rewrapped'

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Consider the simple but beloved chocolate chip cookie. Now imagine that cookie encrusting a brioche roll tucked around a turkey meatball. Or turn your thoughts to a mass-produced cherry pie transformed into an eggroll with dipping sauce. Or the prospect of potato chip soup. Such is the culinary fallout from "Rewrapped," a new Food Network series that builds on the tradition of "Unwrapped," a longtime channel staple that also airs on the Cooking Channel. "Unwrapped," now in reruns, pulls the veil back on how peanut butter, snack cakes, marshmallows and other such items are commercially produced. "Rewrapped," debuting at 8 p.m. EDT Monday and hosted by Joey Fatone, is a competition in which chefs recreate a brand product and then use it in original, sometimes mind-boggling, recipes. The desire to "repurpose" footage from "Unwrapped" led to the new series from producer BSTV Entertainment, according to Marc Summers, a game-show host ("Double Dare") and comedian who leads its three-judge panel. Summers is familiar to Food Network viewers as the host of "Unwrapped," and is a producer whose credits include the channel's "Dinner: Impossible" and "Restaurant: Impossible," which marks its 100th episode on May 7. On "Rewrapped," clips of food production lead into the contest in which three chefs try to match the product's commercial taste and appearance. There can be unexpected challenges, like the smile on Pepperidge Farm's tiny Goldfish crackers. Chefs deftly employed such tools as coat hangers and foil to fashion the grin, Summers said. Points are awarded and carried into round two, which turns up the creative heat with recipes that can be sweet or savory. They also can give a judge pause. "The chefs put these things in front of you and you think, 'Oh, this is not going to be good,'" Summers said. But when he sampled the cookie-meatball-brioche mash-up, he recalled, "Oh, my God, my head exploded. It was fantastic." Is he typically such an open-minded eater? "I have become a bit of a foodie but I'm still not one of those folks who want quail eggs and mustard, or whatever fancy-schmancy stuff folks eat today," he said. ____ Online: http://www.foodnetwork.com Copyright (2014) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.