Tuesday Jun 30, 2015

BBC Three to move entirely online

The BBC is moving its channel BBC Three entirely online in January 2016.The corporation has revealed that it will pledge to broadcast more BBC Three shows aimed at 16-34-year-olds on its BBC One and BBC Two channels. The children's channel CBBC will also run until 9pm -- an extension of two...
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TV

BBC Three to move entirely online
Tuesday Jun 30, 2015
BBC Three to move entirely online

The BBC is moving its channel BBC Three entirely online in January 2016.The corporation has revealed that it will pledge to broadcast more BBC Three shows aimed at 16-34-year-olds on its BBC One and BBC Two channels. The children's channel CBBC will also run until 9pm -- an extension of two hours. The plans have been approved by the BBC Trust, which the BBC has reported as saying it was clear that "the long-term future of broadcasting is online" and that younger viewers -- especially those under 25 -- were already more likely to be watching TV that way. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2015. This article was from AFP Relax News and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

The Production Music Association announces inaugural awards ceremony
Tuesday Jun 30, 2015
The Production Music Association announces inaugural awards ceremony

On September 9, 2015, the PMA will inaugurate its first Mark Awards ceremony.Up until now, the Production Music Association has not had the opportunity to celebrate and reward those who contribute to the industry, which produces audiovisual pieces for productions such as television programs, promotional campaigns, theatrical productions etc. This year, on September 9, the PMA will celebrate its first Mark Awards, named after the late Andy Mark, a founding member of the association. A jury of industry professionals will judge and deliver the awards for each of the 17 categories. There will also be a Hall of Fame Award and an Ambassador Award. The awards ceremony will coincide with the second annual Production Music Conference at the Directors Guild of America in Los Angeles. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2015. This article was from AFP Relax News and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

NeNe Leakes saying goodbye to 'Real Housewives of Atlanta'
Tuesday Jun 30, 2015
NeNe Leakes saying goodbye to 'Real Housewives of Atlanta'

LOS ANGELES (AP) — NeNe Leakes is moving on from "The Real Housewives of Atlanta." The Bravo channel said that Leakes won't return for the reality show's eighth season this fall. She's been with the series about the lives of women in Atlanta since it began in 2008. In an Instagram post Monday, Leakes called the show an "amazing platform," adding that she's decided to step out, in her words, "on faith and not fear." Andy Cohen, executive producer of the "Real Housewives" franchise, tweeted that Leakes is a "Real Housewife forever" and is always welcome back. The 48-year-old Leakes parlayed her reality TV fame into an appearance on "Celebrity Apprentice," roles on shows including "Glee" and "The New Normal," and a fashion collection. Copyright (2015) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Bella Thorne helps kick off MTV's 'Scream' adaptation
Monday Jun 29, 2015
Bella Thorne helps kick off MTV's 'Scream' adaptation

NEW YORK (AP) — Bella Thorne has advice for anyone being chased by a villain in a horror film: "Don't look back, OK? Just don't look back. And try not to trip in the process," joked the actress in a recent interview. She should know. Not only is Thorne a huge fan of the genre but she also has two scary movies under her belt: "Home Invasion" and "Amityville: The Reawakening," due out next year. She's also helping to kick off MTV's TV adaptation of the "Scream" film franchise, premiering at 10 p.m. EDT Tuesday, about a killer on the loose who is targeting teens. Thorne's part is reminiscent of the films where a "name" actress sets the tone for the rest of the story by getting killed off the bat. "I remember when they brought me the script I was like, 'If you can do this well, this could be amazing.' And it is. It's very well-written." At just 17, the actress is highly in demand in her age group. She's successfully juggled roles for both kids her own age, like starring in Disney's "Shake It Up!" for three seasons, with adult material like in HBO's "Big Love." She's also recorded music and writes a YA book series, with a second novel called "Autumn's Kiss" due out this fall. She just signed on to co-star with Patrick Schwarzenegger in the movie "Midnight Sun," based on a Japanese film. It's about a young woman with a disease where exposure to sunlight could kill her so she lives indoors. Her life changes when she falls in love for the first time. Thorne's also learning to sometimes turn down opportunities, no matter how tempting. Her mother recently overruled the idea of making a movie this summer in favor of being a normal teen. "She was like, 'Bella, you're not working all of July. Forget it. You're going on vacation. You're gonna do something with your friends.' ... It's very tempting. It's hard when there's so many good scripts out there and you're like, 'Oh, gosh, I want to play this character. I don't want anyone else to have this chance.'" ___ Online: http://www.mtv.com/shows/scream/ ___ Follow Alicia Rancilio at http://www.twitter.com/aliciar Copyright (2015) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was written by Alicia Rancilio from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Jack Carter, brash comic, dies at 93
Monday Jun 29, 2015
Jack Carter, brash comic, dies at 93

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Jack Carter, whose brash, caustic comedy made him a star in early television and helped him sustain a career of more than a half-century in TV, nightclubs, movies and on stage, died of respiratory failure at his Beverly Hills, California, home, a family spokesman said. Carter turned 93 just four days before he died Sunday, Jeff Sanderson said. In 1948, when network television was beginning, Carter starred in a series of variety shows on ABC. In 1950, Pat Weaver, the visionary NBC programmer who fostered the "Today" and "Tonight" shows and other innovations, scheduled two hours of programming called "Saturday Night Revue." "The Jack Carter Show," broadcast from Chicago, filled the first hour, and the comedian opened it with a standup routine that poked fun at the day's news, a device late-night comics still use. From there, the show moved on to music and comedy skits. The second hour was taken up by "Your Show of Shows," starring Sid Caesar and Imogene Coca. Their sophisticated comedy became a sensation, and after "Saturday Night Revue's" first season, "The Jack Carter Show" was canceled. Although he would remain a popular guest star in television, Carter would never again headline his own network series. "Maybe I come on too strong," he mused in 1963. "Directors and producers fear you when you come on strong. They're afraid they may not be able to control you." The comedian, who had begun his career as a dramatic stage actor, also returned to the theater from time to time. He also performed regularly in nightclubs and appeared in films. He made nearly three dozen movies, including Elvis Presley's "Viva Las Vegas," in which Carter played himself; "The Horizontal Lieutenant"; "The Extraordinary Seaman"; and "The Funny Farm." Throughout his career, Carter remained the attacker, poking fun at members of the audience, disparaging politicians and celebrities. "I'm one of the last entertainers who really works when he's on," he claimed in that 1963 interview. "I work to win the audience. I see these other guys, and they just recite. The less you do, the less you offend, of course, and that's what they want on TV." Carter made numerous appearances on the shows of Ed Sullivan, Alan King and George Burns. He traded gags with Bob Hope on five Hope specials. "The censors flagged you on everything," Carter recalled in the book "The Box: An Oral History of Television, 1920-1961." ''When you did Sullivan, you couldn't say bellybutton." An adept ad-libber, he also became a regular visitor to the late-night talk shows. He turned from comedy to drama in dozens of episodic series including "Dr. Kildare," ''Alfred Hitchcock Presents," ''Hawaii Five-O," ''Murder, She Wrote," ''Baywatch," ''Diagnosis Murder" and "Touched by an Angel." His work as a director included Lucille Ball's CBS series "Here's Lucy" and plays, including "A Thousand Clowns," ''Silver Anniversary" and "Mouth-Trap." Between TV work, Carter was active in theater. In 1956, he starred on Broadway with Sammy Davis Jr. in the musical "Mr. Wonderful." He toured in "Guys and Dolls," ''Born Yesterday," ''A Thousand Clowns," ''The Odd Couple" and "Oliver" (as Fagin). Jack Chakrin was born in New York City in 1922. He joined a stock company after high school, hoping to become a dramatic actor, but his talent at amusing his fellow performers turned him toward comedy. Drafted during World War II, he toured with the cast of Irving Berlin's show, "This Is the Army," and with other entertainment companies. Back in civilian life in 1947, he made his Broadway debut in "Call Me Mister," a musical about soldiers returning from war. After a failed first marriage, Carter married actress Paula Stewart (the ex-wife of Burt Bacharach) in 1960, and they had a son, Michael. The marriage ended in 1970. Carter and wife Roxanne were married in 1971, divorced in 1977 and remarried in 1992. Survivors include his wife, Roxanne; two sons, Michael Carter and Chase Carter; a daughter, Wendy Carter; and grandchildren Jake and Ava. ___ The late Bob Thomas, former Associated Press writer, contributed to this report. ___ This story has been corrected to show that Carter and his wife Roxanne were married twice, in 1971 and 1992, and divorced in 1977. Copyright (2015) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was written by SUE MANNING from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Movies

Review: Gralton's story told in elegant 'Jimmy's Hall'
Tuesday Jun 30, 2015
Review: Gralton's story told in elegant 'Jimmy's Hall'

Jimmy Gralton is not a name you've likely heard before. A modest Irish revolutionary, Gralton has the dubious distinction of being the only native to ever be deported from Ireland. On top of leading a communist group in the provincial county of Leitrim in the 1930s, he incited fear in the ruling classes by running what they viewed as a particularly mutinous establishment: A dance hall. The history books may have yet to give his story a comprehensive treatment, but in "Jimmy's Hall," director Ken Loach and screenwriter Paul Laverty attempt to create a narrative "inspired by the life and times" of this unique man during a period when modernity was knocking violently against the pillars of the establishment. It's neither a biopic nor a history lesson, but the restrained and elegant "Jimmy's Hall" is an evocative story of common people finding hope in a life with little, told with wit and wistfulness. Loach's film opens with stock footage of New York at the time — where jazz, industry and skyscrapers abound in a vibrant and changing world — before jumping across the Atlantic to Leitrim, a bucolic and backward farming town. Some brief subtitles add context to the 1932 Irish scene. This is a people still reeling from the Irish Civil War 10 years prior. Though the conflict has ended, the divisions run deep as those on both sides of the dispute attempt to live in tenuous peace. Jimmy Gralton (Barry Ward) has just returned to his hometown after a decade in New York. He's there to help his ailing mother (Aileen Henry) with her farm, but there's a tension to his arrival. Many onlookers wonder whether to believe he's just returned to lead a quiet life. It's not until some local teens accost him in the street that we begin to understand Jimmy's provocative past. They beg him to reopen the dance hall, having only heard stories of the place. The hall, we discover in a series of rosy-colored flashbacks, was hand built by a group of progressives as a community center for ideas. There, they taught lessons in music, dance, singing, literature and painting, they held parties, and they basked in a safe respite from the clergy and the law. Violent threats forced the hall to close and Jimmy Gralton to flee years ago. The wounds are still raw, but he and his original crew, including lost love Oonagh (Simone Kirby), decide to try it once more. You don't need a priest telling his parish to fear the "Los Angeles-ization" of their culture, or that they must choose between Jesus Christ and Jimmy Gralton's Hall to know that this isn't going to end well. And yet as things devolve, the story becomes much more interesting. The script allows all sides their own perspective in the debate, too. Instead of making them evil caricatures, some of the more fascinating intellectual debates are between two priests, Father Sheridan (Jim Norton) and Father Seamus (Andrew Scott). Loach, who won the Palme d'Or at Cannes in 2006 for "The Wind That Shakes the Barley" (which functions almost like a companion piece to this film), has given "Jimmy's Hall" a truly timeless feel with an easy, classical structure and aesthetic and some truly moving performances from Ward, Kirby and Norton in particular. While this deeply romanticized and fictionalized account of a little-known underdog might not serve you in any trivia capacities, it's also a worthy and loving story of humanity in the face of oppression. "Jimmy's Hall," a Sony Pictures Classics release, is rated PG-13 by the Motion Picture Association of America for "language and a scene of violence." Running time: 106 minutes. Three stars out of four. ___ MPAA Definition of PG-13: Parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13. ___ Follow AP Film Writer Lindsey Bahr on Twitter: www.twitter.com/ldbahr Copyright (2015) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was written by Lindsey Bahr from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

'Attack on Titan' release date revealed
Tuesday Jun 30, 2015
'Attack on Titan' release date revealed

Live-action feature film "Attack on Titan" has been given an official release date.Funimation Entertainment has revealed that the Japanese manga movie will be released by Toho Co. Ltd. in two parts in Japan on August 1 and September 19 this year. The world premiere will take place in Los Angeles on July 14. Series creator Hajime Isayama worked directly with the film's producers to create the screen adaptation from the popular manga series of the same name. The movie tells the story of a world where most of humanity has been destroyed by giants and where the last of mankind fights to survive behind three concentric walls. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2015. This article was from AFP Relax News and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

'Old but not obsolete' Schwarzenegger back again as Terminator
Tuesday Jun 30, 2015
'Old but not obsolete' Schwarzenegger back again as Terminator

"I'm old but I'm not obsolete," Arnold Schwarzenegger says of his return as the fearsome cyborg from the future in his new movie "Terminator Genisys", opening worldwide this week. The line is taken from the movie, spoken by his robotic character, but applies equally well to the 67-year-old Austrian-born Hollywood actor and former governor of California. Schwarzenegger told a June 19 Paris media conference promoting the movie that he was asked to reprise his most famous role a month after finishing his seven-year stint running California in January 2011. "I was very, very excited to 'be back'," he said, putting his accented emphasis on what is now his trademark phrase. - Effects wipe away age - "Terminator Genisys" is the fifth movie in the series that launched in 1984 with Schwarzenegger playing a killer cyborg sent to slay Sarah Connor, the woman who would become mother to a future resistance leader fighting the machines. Schwarzenegger (who wasn't in the last Terminator film that came out in 2009 because he was in governor mode) revisits the original 1984 timeframe thanks to some movie magic. In one early scene, he fights a version of himself -- with the special effects crew digitally painting his face over that of a bodybuilder hired to incarnate Schwarzenegger as he looked three decades ago. "When I saw the movie for the first time three weeks ago I was literally blown away, to see myself fighting me and to see exactly the way I looked in 1984," Schwarzenegger said. "I didn't actually know when I saw the fight who I should root for." The movie reserves some surprises, not least by introducing British actress Emilia Clarke, of "Game of Thrones" fame, as a tough Sarah Connor -- and propelling the story into near present-day. Along the way, it savvily blends together characters and events from the earlier movies. Australian actor Jai Courtney plays Sarah's would-be saviour, Kyle Reese, and "Terminator Genisys" is directed by Alan Taylor, who recently made the Marvel blockbuster "Thor: The Dark World". - Poor early reviews - Curiousity to see Schwarzenegger return to his signature role should help drive box office returns for the movie, which opens in North America and France on Wednesday, and other places around the planet in following days. However Rotten Tomatoes, a website that aggregates film reviews, gave "Terminator Genisys" a poor 33 percent rating, with several critics saying it's silly, with insufficient dramatic structure. That sort of reception, if shared by audiences, would edge most ageing stars closer to the scrapheap of action-star obsolescence -- except Schwarzenegger is convinced that he's still got what it takes and is determined to show it. Next up, he's about to tackle another musclebound movie role that helped make his fame: that of Conan the Barbarian, which is to hit screens next year. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2015. This article was from AFP Relax News and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Emilia Clarke conquers the big screen with a 'Terminator'
Tuesday Jun 30, 2015
Emilia Clarke conquers the big screen with a 'Terminator'

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The secret about overnight success in Hollywood is that it never actually happens that way. To the casual observer, Emilia Clarke might look like one of the lucky ones: The young British actress was seemingly plucked out of the ether to star as Daenerys Targaryen on HBO's wildly popular "Game of Thrones." Just a few years later, she was chosen to make the leap to a summer blockbuster as Sarah Connor, one of action's most iconic heroines, in "Terminator Genisys," out Wednesday. The ebullient Clarke, who nearly jumped out of her seat to answer questions in a recent interview, is the first to stress that she's lucky to have reached these heights by age 28. But her path to playing some of the big and small screen's most powerful women wasn't exactly laid out before her. Though Clarke is not from a royal Hollywood bloodline, she likes to say that she "grew up backstage" at the theaters of London, where her father was a sound designer. Clarke has also said she wanted to act since she was 3 years old, although that makes her laugh now. "It was one of the first interviews I'd ever done and it was like, pick a number, any number, and I was like, 'Let's go with 3. Sure. Why not?' Basically I just wanted to say from very young. I just can't even think of a time in my life where I didn't want to be an actor," she said. After hearing her prattle on for years about acting ambitions, her parents trotted her out to look at a drama school when she was 11. Clarke was terrified. She saw the other kids in the school, hyper serious and driven, and decided she wanted to stay with her regular studies, work hard and get good grades, "just in case." If she still wanted to be a part of that world when she turned 18, she would go to drama school. It turns out, she did. After a couple of "terrible tries," she got on a waiting list at the Drama School of London. When someone dropped out, she got in. But even upon graduation, there were only waitressing and other non-acting jobs available — things she swears she was "really, genuinely awful at." After scoring a few minor television roles the year after graduating, Clarke got "Game of Thrones" in 2010 and instantly became a fan favorite as the Mother of Dragons. She's now one of only a handful of original cast members whose characters are still alive on the show. Then in late 2013, Alan Taylor, who had directed Clarke in "Game of Thrones," cast her as Sarah in "Genisys," the fifth film in the James Cameron-created series. She could barely wait to get started, and dragged co-star Jai Courtney to some acting classes far before production began so that they could begin to workshop their characters. On set, when she wasn't working to keep up with her burly male co-stars, including Arnold Schwarzenegger, she was in weapons training, stunt training, or just working out. "There's such authority in this young woman coupled with this tremendous vulnerability," said Taylor. "You look at those eyes and you kind of want to take care of her at the same time that she's barking orders at you and scaring you." This Sarah Connor is a different take on the character Linda Hamilton originated 31 years ago. She's a warrior from the start, living out a predetermined destiny to give birth to the leader of an eventual revolution. But she's dismayed by the lack of choices in her life — which is not dissimilar to Clarke's "Game of Thrones" queen, or even her own experiences. Clarke has seen how the trajectory of fame can easily get out of hand. While there are wonderful plusses, she said, there are also the day-to-day realities and pressures and "the fact that the choices that you make may reverberate with a 13-year-old girl reading a magazine about your life." It also helps when you can exist somewhat under the radar in your daily life. Without her long, blonde "Game of Thrones" wig, Clarke gets to have it both ways. "I've been incredibly lucky in that I'm unrecognizable without my wig," said the actress, who lives in London. "People don't clock me at all. On one level on a day-to-day basis it's brilliant because I live a ridiculously boring, normal life when I'm not filming." Up next, Clarke is about to start work on an adaptation of JoJo Moyes' book "Me Before You" and will be back for a sixth season of "Thrones" in no time. As for what the future holds, Clarke says she just wants to do "a little bit of everything." "I feel confident that I can try lots of different things. An independent drama, a romantic comedy, Pixar animation," she said. "Maybe even a female James Bond! Just throwing it out there." ___ Follow AP Film Writer Lindsey Bahr on Twitter: www.twitter.com/ldbahr Copyright (2015) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was written by Lindsey Bahr from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Box Office Top 20: 'Jurassic,' 'Inside Out' top 'Ted 2'
Monday Jun 29, 2015
Box Office Top 20: 'Jurassic,' 'Inside Out' top 'Ted 2'

LOS ANGELES (AP) — "Inside Out" and "Jurassic World" are still drawing significant audiences to theaters even in their second and third weekends at the multiplex, leaving little room for newer fare like "Ted 2." The dinosaurs of "Jurassic World" continued to dominate with a $54.5 million weekend, pushing its domestic total to over $500 million. Disney's and Pixar's "Inside Out" came in a close second with $52.3 million. The intense competition might have affected the opening of Seth MacFarlane's "Ted 2." The raunchy sequel brought in a decent $33.5 million, but that number was significantly under the $45 to $50 million expectations — not to mention the first film's $54.4 million debut in 2012. Warner Bros. military dog drama "Max," meanwhile, earned an expected $12.2 million. The top 20 movies at U.S. and Canadian theaters Friday through Sunday, followed by distribution studio, gross, number of theater locations, average receipts per location, total gross and number of weeks in release, as compiled Monday by Rentrak: 1. "Jurassic World," Universal, $54,532,615, 4,198 locations, $12,990 average, $500,373,420, 3 weeks. 2. "Inside Out," Disney, $52,323,354, 4,132 locations, $12,663 average, $185,140,364, 2 weeks. 3. "Ted 2," Universal, $33,507,870, 3,442 locations, $9,735 average, $33,507,870, 1 week. 4. "Max," Warner Bros., $12,155,254, 2,855 locations, $4,258 average, $12,155,254, 1 week. 5. "Spy," 20th Century Fox, $7,911,786, 3,194 locations, $2,477 average, $88,462,290, 4 weeks. 6. "San Andreas," Warner Bros., $5,402,416, 2,620 locations, $2,062 average, $141,997,929, 5 weeks. 7. "Dope," Open Road, $2,782,840, 1,851 locations, $1,503 average, $11,697,218, 2 weeks. 8. "Insidious Chapter 3," Focus Features, $2,004,222, 1,612 locations, $1,243 average, $49,795,400, 4 weeks. 9. "Mad Max: Fury Road," Warner Bros., $1,764,436, 961 locations, $1,836 average, $147,107,258, 7 weeks. 10. "Avengers: Age Of Ultron," Disney, $1,688,938, 1,097 locations, $1,540 average, $452,474,193, 9 weeks. 11. "Pitch Perfect 2," Universal, $1,464,180, 1,061 locations, $1,380 average, $181,057,940, 7 weeks. 12. "Love & Mercy," Roadside Attractions, $1,272,491, 728 locations, $1,748 average, $9,255,698, 4 weeks. 13. "Tomorrowland," Disney, $1,051,966, 714 locations, $1,473 average, $90,164,982, 6 weeks. 14. "Me And Earl And The Dying Girl," Fox Searchlight, $992,439, 354 locations, $2,804 average, $1,856,490, 3 weeks. 15. "Entourage," Warner Bros., $808,157, 544 locations, $1,486 average, $31,386,676, 4 weeks. 16. "I'll See You In My Dreams," Bleecker Street, $609,698, 290 locations, $2,102 average, $5,030,850, 7 weeks. 17. "Home," 20th Century Fox, $399,315, 275 locations, $1,452 average, $174,744,026, 14 weeks. 18. "Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2," Sony, $318,020, 236 locations, $1,348 average, $69,832,200, 11 week. 19. "Cinderella," Disney, $261,264, 235 locations, $1,112 average, $200,286,777, 16 weeks. 20. "Aloha," Sony, $197,063, 240 locations, $821 average, $20,482,456, 5 weeks. --- Universal and Focus are owned by NBC Universal, a unit of Comcast Corp.; Sony, Columbia, Sony Screen Gems and Sony Pictures Classics are units of Sony Corp.; Paramount is owned by Viacom Inc.; Disney, Pixar and Marvel are owned by The Walt Disney Co.; Miramax is owned by Filmyard Holdings LLC; 20th Century Fox and Fox Searchlight are owned by 21st Century Fox; Warner Bros. and New Line are units of Time Warner Inc.; MGM is owned by a group of former creditors including Highland Capital, Anchorage Advisors and Carl Icahn; Lionsgate is owned by Lions Gate Entertainment Corp.; IFC is owned by AMC Networks Inc.; Rogue is owned by Relativity Media LLC. Copyright (2015) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Events

'Glee'-type music contest crowns winners in New York City
Tuesday Jun 30, 2015
'Glee'-type music contest crowns winners in New York City

NEW YORK (AP) — A 17-year-old New Yorker math and science whiz and an 18-year-old Californian who will study musical theater in college have won top honors at the National High School Musical Theater Awards. Anthony Skillman, of Tustin, California, was named best actor and Marla Louissaint, of New York City, was named best actress Monday night at the seventh-annual "Glee"-like competition, nicknamed the Jimmy Awards after theater owner James Nederlander. Louissaint sang "I'm Here" from "The Color Purple" for her solo — a song that helped convince her parents to let her sing and act — and Skillman sang "It Don't Make Sense" from Jason Robert Brown's musical "Parade." Louissaint parents watched their daughter take the trophy and got huge hugs afterward. Her grandmother was also in the audience, despite just undergoing a radiation treatment. She will attend Fordham University in the fall studying electrical engineering and hope to keep singing on the side. "I'm open to anything that comes my way," she said Tuesday. "I'm really excited about what's ahead." Skillman just graduated from high school and will next attend college at Texas State University for musical theater. "I'm still in shock," he said. "I feel so honored and blessed to have the opportunity." Each will receive a $10,000 scholarship award, capping a monthslong winnowing process that began with 50,000 students from 1,000 schools and ended at the Minskoff Theatre, the long-term home of "The Lion King," which doesn't perform on Mondays. The 52 teens who made it to New York this year — 26 girls and 26 boys — got a five-day theatrical boot camp fueled by pizza at New York University's Tisch School of the Arts, complete with scrambling to learn an opening and closing group number, performing their medley numbers and advice on their solo songs, plus a field trip to watch "An American in Paris." The judges were Bernie Telsey and Rachel Hoffman from casting company Telsey + Company, Disney Theatrical Group head Thomas Schumacher, New York University's Kent Gash, National Artists Management Company leader Alecia Parker, casting specialist Tara Rubin, and Nick Scandalios from the Nederlander Organization. The host was two-time Tony Award winner Michael Cerveris, who is starring on Broadway in "Fun Home." Four runners-up will each receive $2,500. ___ Online: http://www.nhsmta.com ___ Mark Kennedy can be reached at http://twitter.com/KennedyTwits Copyright (2015) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was written by Mark Kennedy from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Misty Copeland named first black female principal at ABT
Tuesday Jun 30, 2015
Misty Copeland named first black female principal at ABT

NEW YORK (AP) — Misty Copeland, the Missouri-born dancer who has become a forceful voice for diversity in ballet, was named a principal dancer at American Ballet Theatre on Tuesday — the first African-American ballerina to achieve that status in the company's 75-year history. The company announced the promotion six days after Copeland made her New York debut in the role of Odette/Odile in "Swan Lake," one of the most important roles in a ballerina's repertoire. The emotional performance ended with Copeland being greeted onstage by trailblazing black ballerinas of earlier generations. Copeland, 32, has become a celebrity in the past several years, making the cover of Time magazine as one of the most influential figures of 2015, and writing a best-selling memoir, "Life in Motion: An Unlikely Ballerina," in which she recounted the challenges she faced on the road to her hard-won perch in ballet — and which has been optioned for a movie. She also was the subject of a documentary at this year's Tribeca Film Festival. Copeland also was featured in a popular ad for Under Armour sportswear that shows her leaping and spinning in a studio, while a narrator recounts some of the negative feedback she received as a youngster, when she was told she had the wrong body for ballet and had started too late — at 13. The dancer also has appeared as a guest host on the Fox show "So You Think You Can Dance" and was a presenter at this year's Tony awards. Copeland is the first black ballerina to be named principal at ABT, and the second black dancer overall. Desmond Richardson, a black male dancer, was a principal with the company in 1977-1978, and returned as a guest artist later. Also named a principal dancer on Tuesday was longtime soloist Stella Abrera. Copyright (2015) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was written by Jocelyn Noveck from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

The Production Music Association announces inaugural awards ceremony
Tuesday Jun 30, 2015
The Production Music Association announces inaugural awards ceremony

On September 9, 2015, the PMA will inaugurate its first Mark Awards ceremony.Up until now, the Production Music Association has not had the opportunity to celebrate and reward those who contribute to the industry, which produces audiovisual pieces for productions such as television programs, promotional campaigns, theatrical productions etc. This year, on September 9, the PMA will celebrate its first Mark Awards, named after the late Andy Mark, a founding member of the association. A jury of industry professionals will judge and deliver the awards for each of the 17 categories. There will also be a Hall of Fame Award and an Ambassador Award. The awards ceremony will coincide with the second annual Production Music Conference at the Directors Guild of America in Los Angeles. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2015. This article was from AFP Relax News and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Frieze London reveals commissions that will transform Regent's Park
Tuesday Jun 30, 2015
Frieze London reveals commissions that will transform Regent's Park

Details are rolling out about this fall's Frieze London art fair -- first the participating galleries, and now the works to be exhibited in Regent's Park as part of the celebrated Frieze Projects program.Frieze Projects was established in 2013 as a non-profit program of commissions, film and music events, and in 2015 seven commissions will see practitioners working in architecture, publishing and theater design explore mobile architecture and alternative realities, taking inspiration from Frieze London's temporary structure in the Park. These commissions will take impressive and unusual forms, such as an installation by American conceptual artist Lutz Bacher transforming the entrance corridor with found objects from film sets; an evolving exhibition by US artist Asad Raza inspired by caves worshipping Pan that can be accessed through a door at the back of the fair bookshop; and a series of mobile structures by Georgian artist Thea Djordjadze inspired by the Monstera Deliciosa (‘Swiss cheese plants') found in Henri Matisse's studio.In its second year, the Frieze Art Award provides an opportunity for an artist aged 25-40 to present a site-specific work as part of Frieze Projects. 2015 winner Rachel Rose will present a scale model of the fair's structure that will simulate the sonic and "visual sense" frequencies of the animals that inhabit the Park. Earlier in June, Frieze London revealed it would present more than 160 galleries from nearly 30 countries, for a 13th edition organizers say will be "unrivaled in range and depth." Cheim & Read (New York), Galerie Kamel Mennour (Paris) and Simon Lee Gallery (London) are among galleries joining the main section, while Focus -- a destination for young galleries -- will have seven newcomers and Live -- dedicated to performance and participatory work -- will look to build on its 2014 debut. The contemporary art fair runs alongside the more classically oriented Frieze Masters -- which spotlights 20th century works and will feature 131 galleries for its fourth edition.Together, the events collectively known as the Frieze Art Fair will run October 14-18, with Frieze London ending a day earlier. friezelondon.com Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2015. This article was from AFP Relax News and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Diddy's son Quincy calls father's arrest a 'hiccup'
Monday Jun 29, 2015
Diddy's son Quincy calls father's arrest a 'hiccup'

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Diddy's son Quincy Brown has dismissed his father's recent arrest as a "hiccup." Brown walked the red carpet of the BET Awards with Diddy's three young daughters. He brushed aside questions about Diddy's arrest last week. The music mogul, whose real name is Sean Combs, faces assault charges for an alleged attack involving a weight-room kettlebell at the athletic facilities of the University of California at Los Angeles, where Diddy's other son Justin plays football. "Hiccups happen in life. You push that to the side. You worry about that later," Brown told The Associated Press. "That's why we here right now just enjoying the BET Awards. We come every year. We're supporting the family, supporting my dad. And my dad's got a big performance this year." Diddy led a reunion of original Bad Boy musicians including Faith Evans, the Lox and Ma$e at the show. He also debuted a new song with Pharrell, "Finna Get Loose." "This is a big moment," Brown said. "This is like a family reunion for Bad Boy. ... Bad Boy is still here. We ain't never went nowhere. Can't stop, won't stop." The performance was a huge crowd pleaser, but it didn't go all smoothly: Diddy fell through an open trap door on stage while performing. Copyright (2015) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was written by Ryan Pearson from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.