Wednesday May 27, 2015

'American Horror Story' cast swells with Max Greenfield addition

The star count of "American Horror Story: Hotel" keeps growing, with Max Greenfield joining nine others on the cast list for October's fifth season, including Lady Gaga, Wes Bentley, and Kathy Bates.Max Greenfield: Well known for his critically acclaimed time on Zooey Deschanel comedy "New...
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TV

'American Horror Story' cast swells with Max Greenfield addition
Wednesday May 27, 2015
'American Horror Story' cast swells with Max Greenfield addition

The star count of "American Horror Story: Hotel" keeps growing, with Max Greenfield joining nine others on the cast list for October's fifth season, including Lady Gaga, Wes Bentley, and Kathy Bates.Max Greenfield: Well known for his critically acclaimed time on Zooey Deschanel comedy "New Girl," New York-born Greenfield has also held down recurring roles in "Veronica Mars," "Modern Men," "Ugly Betty" and "Greek." Angela Bassett: Known for playing American cultural icons in Rosa Parks ("The Rosa Parks Story"), Tina Turner ("What's Love Got to Do with It"), Betty Shabazz ("Malcolm X," "Panther"), and Katherine Jackson ("The Jacksons: An American Dream"). She returns from seasons 3 and 4. Kathy Bates: Another season 3 and 4 returnee, Bates is famous for her key role in Stephen King horror "Misery." Significant roles in "Fried Green Tomatoes," "Primary Colors," "About Schmidt," "Titanic," and 1999's "Annie" remake have been among other highlights. Wes Bentley: Breakthrough came with "American Beauty," and Bentley has since added car park horror "P2," worldwide blockbuster "The Hunger Games," space drama "Interstellar" and Terence Malick tale "Knight of Cups" to his varied resumé, joining "American Horror Story" in season four. Matt Bomer: A supporting role in "Chuck" led to the lead in police procedural "White Collar," Bomer joined the FX channel anthology for its fourth season, "American Horror Story: Freak Show."Lady Gaga: Singer Stefani Germanotta, made famous for her musical skill and fashion sense, has been in and out of screen acting since a 2001 cameo in "The Sopranos." The first cast member announced for "American Horror Story: Hotel" in an exciting start to the show's promotional push. Cheyenne Jackson: Another newcomer to the series and an accomplished stage actor and singer, Jackson counts "United 93," Ira Sachs' "Love is Strange" and "30 Rock" among his screen credits. Sarah Paulson: A multi-award winner already associated with televisual horror thanks to "American Gothic," Paulson has been with "American Horror Story" since season one, "Murder House."Evan Peters: Superhero on the big screen as Quicksilver in "X-Men: Days of Future Past" and its upcoming sequel, Peters has also been with "American Horror Story" since its 2011 beginnings. Chloë Sevigny: A fashion icon before entering film and TV, as with Lady Gaga, Sevigny now has a long cinema and TV resumé, appearing in "Big Love" and "Portlandia,"and guesting on "American Horror Story" series 2 and earning a recall for season 5. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2015. This article was from AFP Relax News and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Watch: Trailer for 'Mad Max Savage Road' video game hits the web
Tuesday May 26, 2015
Watch: Trailer for 'Mad Max Savage Road' video game hits the web

New footage for the upcoming cross-platform game with cinematic tie-ins, offers a first glimpse of what to expect in terms of plot and setting.The game, developed by Avalanche Studios, will launch on the PS4 and Xbox One in September, and although it is clearly inspired by the post-apocalyptic world created by George Miller, its makers promise that it won't simply be a rehash of the latest film. Blending a beat ‘em up with a driving game, players will have to build friendships, avoid enemies, build and drive a new set of wheels and do battle with warboys in order to survive. Watch the trailer: https://youtu.be/GjBMpc9IgFA Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2015. This article was from AFP Relax News and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

‘Catastrophe' to get Amazon premiere in June
Tuesday May 26, 2015
‘Catastrophe' to get Amazon premiere in June

The new six-part comedy series written by and staring Rob Delaney is coming to Amazon Prime customers in the US on June 19.An Amazon original production, "Catastrophe" is set in London and follows the trials and tribulations of a US man and Irish woman attempting to build a relationship following an accidental pregnancy. As well as Delaney, the show also stars Sharon Horgan, Ashley Jensen and Carrie Fisher and will be coming to Amazon's UK Prime subscribers later this year. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2015. This article was from AFP Relax News and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Periscope lands on Android
Tuesday May 26, 2015
Periscope lands on Android

Twitter has finally launched a Google-friendly version of its live video streaming app.Just like the iOS version, users will be able to watch both live and already recorded footage and interact with broadcasters, however, the Android version also brings new features.  Notification controls are more comprehensive, and there's the welcome addition of a ‘return to broadcast' button for when a stream is interrupted by a phone call or other incoming message. Available to download later Tuesday, the app works with any Android handset running 4.4 Kitkat onwards. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2015. This article was from AFP Relax News and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Jessica Lange to return to Broadway in 2016 a familiar role
Tuesday May 26, 2015
Jessica Lange to return to Broadway in 2016 a familiar role

NEW YORK (AP) — Jessica Lange will return to Broadway next spring in a production of "Long Day's Journey Into Night," playing the same role she did 15 years ago in London. The Roundabout Theatre Company said Tuesday that the Oscar- and Emmy-winner will join Gabriel Byrne in a revival of Eugene O'Neill's play in March. Jonathan Kent will direct the production at the American Airlines Theatre. Lange previously played the role of Mary Tyrone in a 2000 production of O'Neill's familial drama in London, receiving an Olivier Award nomination for her performance as the morphine-addicted mother. The "American Horror Story" star made her Broadway debut in a 1992 production of "A Streetcar Named Desire" and returned to the stage in the 2005 revival of "The Glass Menagerie." Copyright (2015) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was written by Mark Kennedy from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Movies

U2 brings its high-tech 'Innocence & Experience' tour to LA
Wednesday May 27, 2015
U2 brings its high-tech 'Innocence & Experience' tour to LA

INGLEWOOD, Calif. (AP) — U2's latest live show included a call to fight AIDS, condemnation of the 1974 car bombings in Ireland, the voice of Stephen Hawking, high-tech stage gimmicks and just over two hours of music, including most of its 2014 album, "Songs of Innocence." The Irish quartet brought its "Innocence & Experience" tour to the Forum Tuesday, the first of five nights in the Los Angeles area. Launched earlier this month in Vancouver, Canada, the North American and European tour continues through Nov. 15. Performing together since 1976, front man Bono, guitarist the Edge, bassist Adam Clayton and drummer Larry Mullen, Jr. know how to put on a rock show. But they were lacking a little in energy and excitement for their opening LA performance, perhaps relying too heavily on the giant horizontal screens suspended above their high-tech stage. As with U2s previous arena tours, the stage plays a starring role in the show. The massive screens worked for some numbers, such as Bono's autobiographical "Cedarwood Road," lending an effect that made him look like he was walking through a cartoon town. But when the foursome performed between the parallel screens during "Invisible" and "Even Better than the Real Thing," they appeared to be playing on TV, not live on stage. Still, they hit all their marks and sounded album-tight. They opened with the new, "The Miracle (of Joey Ramone)," and the old, "Electric Co.," from their 1980 debut. The set included such hits as "Vertigo," ''I Will Follow," ''Beautiful Day" and "With or Without You." After "Bullet the Blue Sky," Bono held his hands above his head and said, "Don't shoot. I'm an American." While performing "Pride," inspired by Martin Luther King, Jr., Bono called on the spirit of the late leader. "Dr. King, we need you in Ferguson and Baltimore now more than ever," Bono said. "We need the spirit of nonviolence, the spirit of love." The singer also lauded Irish voters for saying "love is the highest law" by legalizing same-sex marriage last week. "They're putting the gay into Gaelic," he quipped. The band was at its best when the gimmicks gave way to the music. Mullen marching with a snare drum gave new power to "Sunday Bloody Sunday," and a stripped-down version of "Every Breaking Wave," with Bono accompanied by the Edge on piano, was stirring. A clip of Hawking's voice played before the band returned for its encore. He talked about the necessity of becoming "global citizens" as a tout for Bono's anti-poverty organization, One, flashed on the giant screens. Bono also used the encore to discuss AIDS and an effort to end transmission of the disease between mother and child in the next five years. He sang a few bars of Paul Simon's "Mother and Child Reunion" to make the point before the band closed with "One." ___ Follow AP Entertainment Writer Sandy Cohen at www.twitter.com/APSandy . Copyright (2015) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was written by Sandy Cohen from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Documentary planned for George Miller's ill-fated superhero film
Tuesday May 26, 2015
Documentary planned for George Miller's ill-fated superhero film

The Australian director behind "Mad Max" and "Babe" abandoned plans for Justice League Mortal -- a film that would have bought Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman together on screen -- in 2008.Now, seven years on and as hype surrounding "Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice" reaches a crescendo, fellow Australian director Ryan Unicomb has announced that he's working on a documentary about the film to understand what went wrong.  Speaking to Inside Film, Unicomb said that his project already had backing and would be an "unbiased account of the project's development, preproduction and cancellation, as well as the impact on the Australian film industry." Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2015. This article was from AFP Relax News and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Audiard's 'Dheepan' wins Palme d'Or in upset Cannes finale
Tuesday May 26, 2015
Audiard's 'Dheepan' wins Palme d'Or in upset Cannes finale

CANNES, France (AP) — The 68th Cannes Film Festival was brought to a surprising close Sunday with Jacques Audiard's Sri Lankan refugee drama taking the festival's coveted top honor, the Palme d'Or. The choice of "Dheepan," as selected by a jury led by Joel and Ethan Coen, left some critics scratching their heads. While the dapper French filmmaker has drawn widespread acclaim for films such as "A Prophet" and "Rust and Bone," some critics were disappointed by the thriller climax of Audiard's film. "Dheepan" is about a trio of Sri Lankans who pretend to be a family in order to flee their war-torn country and are settled in a violent housing project outside Paris. "This isn't a jury of film critics," Joel Coen told reporters after the awards ceremony, alongside fellow jurors like Guillermo del Toro and Jake Gyllenhaal. "This is a jury of artists who are looking at the work." The win for "Dheepan" comes at a time when Europe is particularly attuned to the experience of immigrants, following the recent deaths of hundreds crossing the Mediterranean, seeking Italian shores. Jury members, though, said "Dheepan" was chosen for its overall strength as a film, rather than any topicality. "We all thought it was a very beautiful movie," said Ethan Coen, calling the decision "swift." ''Everyone had some high level of excitement and enthusiasm for it." Audiard, springing to the podium at the Palais des Festivals, accepted the award with warm gratitude, bowing to the jury. He was joined by the makeshift parents of his film: Kalieaswari Srinivasan and Antonythasan Jesuthasan, who himself was Tamil Tiger child soldier before finding political asylum in France. "To receive a prize from the Coen brothers is exceptional," said Audiard, who added that only receiving one from the Luc and Jean-Pierre Dardenne, the Belgian filmmaking siblings, could equal it. The runner-up prize, the Grand Prix, went to "Son of Saul," a grim Holocaust drama by first-time Hungarian director László Nemes. Some expected Nemes' horrifying plunge into the life of an Auschwitz worker to take the top award, but it's been 26 years since a debut film (Steven Soderbergh's "Sex, Lies, and Videotape") was given the Palme. English actress Sienna Miller and Canadian actor Xavier Dolan, both jury members, sounded especially moved by "Son of Saul." Miller called it "breathtaking" and an extraordinary accomplishment for a first-time filmmaker. "Europe is still haunted by the destruction of the European Jews," said Nemes. "That's something that lives with us." Hou Hsiao-Hsien, the masterful 68-year-old Taiwanese filmmaker, won best director for his first feature in eight years: "The Assassin," a lushly painterly martial arts drama. The best actress prize was split but not the way some expected. It was given to both Rooney Mara, half of the romantic pair of Todd Haynes' '50s lesbian drama "Carol," and Emmanuelle Bercot, the French star of the roller coaster marriage drama "My King." (Bercot also directed the festival opener, "Standing Tall," about a delinquent teenager.) Any split was presumed to go to Mara and her "Carol" co-star, Cate Blanchett. Best actor was awarded to Vincent Lindon, the veteran French actor of Stéphane Brizé's "The Measure of a Man." He plays a man struggling to make a living after a long period of unemployment. The visibly moved Lindon won over some big-name competition, including Michael Caine, the star of Paolo Sorrentino's unrewarded "Youth," a wry, melancholy portrait of old age. Lindon's award added to a banner year at Cannes for France, which had five films out of the 19 in competition and went home with three awards. Yorgos Lanthimos, a Greek filmmaker working in English for the first time, took the jury prize for his "The Lobster," a deadpan dystopian comedy, starring Colin Farrell and Rachel Weisz, about a near-future where unmarried singles are turned into the animal of their choice. "Chronic," an understated drama about a home-care nurse (Tim Roth) for the terminally ill, took best screenplay for Mexican writer-director Michel Franco. Franco and Roth met three years ago when Roth, serving on a Cannes jury, helped award Franco the Un Certain Regard prize. "It's a Cannes story," said Franco. The Camera d'Or, Cannes award for best first feature film, went to "La Tierra Y la Sombra." César Augusto Acevedo's debut, which played in the Critics Week section, is about an old farmer returning home to tend to his gravely ill son. The Coens themselves took the Palme in 1991 for "Barton Fink." The last two Cannes winners have been three-hour art-house epics: the glacial Turkish drama "Winter Sleep," chosen last year by Jane Campion's jury, and "Blue is the Warmest Color," as picked by Steven Spielberg's jury. This year's competition slate left some critics calling it a so-so year for Cannes. Some of the films that drew the biggest raves ("Mad Max: Fury Road," Pixar's "Inside Out") played out of competition, while some in it (like Gus Van Sant's "The Sea of Trees") drew loud boos. The festival was dominated by discussion about gender equality with many — from Blanchett to Jane Fonda — speaking about female opportunity in the movie business. "You hope it's not just the year," said Blanchett of the attention to women in film. "It's not some sort of fashionable moment." An honorary Palme d'Or was also given to French filmmaker Agnes Varda, the first woman to receive one and only the fourth director after Woody Allen, Clint Eastwood and Bernardo Bertolucci. But the festival was overrun by an unlikely scandal when several women were turned away from the formal premiere of Todd Haynes' "Carol" for wearing flat shoes, rather than high heels. The festival insisted it was the mistake of overzealous security guards and not part of Cannes' notoriously strict dress code. The festival, as it often is, was dominated by the unexpected, even on its last night. Nothing was more unforeseen — not even the Palme for "Dheepan" — than John C. Reilly, a co-star of "The Lobster" and another competition entry, "Tale of Tales," took the stage to sing "Just a Gigolo" in a bright white suit. ___ AP's Thomas Adamson contributed to this report. Copyright (2015) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was written by Jake Coyle from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Bob Marley musical tries to help heal an uneasy Baltimore
Tuesday May 26, 2015
Bob Marley musical tries to help heal an uneasy Baltimore

NEW YORK (AP) — Most theater professionals like to say that whatever they're working on is very relevant to what's going on in the real world. That was not possibly more true than in Baltimore this spring. The city's flagship theater, Center Stage, debuted a musical about reggae icon and civil rights activist Bob Marley during the city's spasm of violence and peaceful protests following the death of Freddie Gray in police custody. Several preview performances for the musical "Marley" were lost amid protests marching near the theater and the actors had to rush to finish rehearsals early on several evenings to accommodate a city-wide curfew. There were soldiers, horses and armored vehicles in the streets and helicopters in the air as the cast and crew tried to finish a work that highlighted the life of a singer who demanded social justice and freedom for black people. A new framing scene was added to the play in which two black men watch footage of the Baltimore protests on a smartphone, making the connection between the two movements clear. On May 2, the cast went out into the streets to give a free concert, including singing "One Love" to try to heal the city. "When real life is happening around you and you're trying to produce art, you have to submit to real life and have faith," said Kwame Kwei-Armah, Center Stage's artistic director who also wrote and directed the Marley musical. "I'm not sure in my life that I'll ever feel that connected or ever feel that blessed or ever feel that visceral call that theater is about the here and now." The musical focuses on the years 1975 to 1978, when Marley survived an attempted assassination in Jamaica and went into exile in London. It's the first time a stage musical has used both Marley's songs and his life story. The musical features mid-'70s Marley albums as "Exodus," ''Kaya," and "Rastaman Vibration," which include the songs "Jamming," ''Three Little Birds" and "Roots, Rock, Reggae." Mitchell Brunings portrays the title character. Kwei-Armah played Marley's song "Burnin' and Lootin'" on his way into work on the night of the first curfew. The song's lyrics were prescient: This morning I woke up in a curfew/Oh God, I was a prisoner, too/Could not recognize the faces standing over me/They were all dressed in uniforms of brutality." "Somebody wrote these lyrics 30 years ago, somebody tapped into something 30, 40 years ago and it's more applicable than some of the work I've done throughout all of my life," said Kwei-Armah. "It's humbling and beautiful. It validates for me why I'm doing theater." Suzette Newman, an executive producer of "Marley," said she is working to get the musical on the road after it ends its run in Baltimore on June 14. "We absolutely hope that it will travel and go elsewhere. We're in the process of those discussions right now," she said. Until then, she and Kwei-Armah watch nightly as the audience goes from punching the air with "Get Up, Stand Up" to joining the actors onstage in the show's emotional climax with "One Love." "The power of Bob hits me afresh nearly every night. Suzette and I are standing at the back, seeing the audience as they respond and run onto the stage to sing with the cast 'One Love' in a city that needs to be one and healed," said Kwei-Armah. ___ Online: http://centerstage.org Copyright (2015) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was written by Mark Kennedy from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Agent: 'Lawrence of Arabia' star Omar Sharif has Alzheimer's
Monday May 25, 2015
Agent: 'Lawrence of Arabia' star Omar Sharif has Alzheimer's

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Legendary "Lawrence of Arabia" actor Omar Sharif is battling Alzheimer's disease, his agent Steve Kenis confirmed to The Associated Press on Monday. No additional details were provided about the 83-year-old or his care. His son, Tarek Sharif, revealed the diagnosis in an interview with Spanish newspaper El Mundo on May 23. The Egyptian-born Sharif rose to international stardom with his role in the 1962 epic "Lawrence of Arabia"— Sharif's first English-language film. He earned an Oscar nomination for his turn as Sherif Ali in David Lean's iconic film opposite Peter O'Toole. Sharif followed the breakthrough performance with the title role in Lean's "Doctor Zhivago," co-starring Julie Christie. He then played Fanny Brice's husband, Nicky Arnstein, in "Funny Girl" alongside Barbra Streisand. His last completed feature film credits were in 2013. Copyright (2015) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Events

'American Horror Story' cast swells with Max Greenfield addition
Wednesday May 27, 2015
'American Horror Story' cast swells with Max Greenfield addition

The star count of "American Horror Story: Hotel" keeps growing, with Max Greenfield joining nine others on the cast list for October's fifth season, including Lady Gaga, Wes Bentley, and Kathy Bates.Max Greenfield: Well known for his critically acclaimed time on Zooey Deschanel comedy "New Girl," New York-born Greenfield has also held down recurring roles in "Veronica Mars," "Modern Men," "Ugly Betty" and "Greek." Angela Bassett: Known for playing American cultural icons in Rosa Parks ("The Rosa Parks Story"), Tina Turner ("What's Love Got to Do with It"), Betty Shabazz ("Malcolm X," "Panther"), and Katherine Jackson ("The Jacksons: An American Dream"). She returns from seasons 3 and 4. Kathy Bates: Another season 3 and 4 returnee, Bates is famous for her key role in Stephen King horror "Misery." Significant roles in "Fried Green Tomatoes," "Primary Colors," "About Schmidt," "Titanic," and 1999's "Annie" remake have been among other highlights. Wes Bentley: Breakthrough came with "American Beauty," and Bentley has since added car park horror "P2," worldwide blockbuster "The Hunger Games," space drama "Interstellar" and Terence Malick tale "Knight of Cups" to his varied resumé, joining "American Horror Story" in season four. Matt Bomer: A supporting role in "Chuck" led to the lead in police procedural "White Collar," Bomer joined the FX channel anthology for its fourth season, "American Horror Story: Freak Show."Lady Gaga: Singer Stefani Germanotta, made famous for her musical skill and fashion sense, has been in and out of screen acting since a 2001 cameo in "The Sopranos." The first cast member announced for "American Horror Story: Hotel" in an exciting start to the show's promotional push. Cheyenne Jackson: Another newcomer to the series and an accomplished stage actor and singer, Jackson counts "United 93," Ira Sachs' "Love is Strange" and "30 Rock" among his screen credits. Sarah Paulson: A multi-award winner already associated with televisual horror thanks to "American Gothic," Paulson has been with "American Horror Story" since season one, "Murder House."Evan Peters: Superhero on the big screen as Quicksilver in "X-Men: Days of Future Past" and its upcoming sequel, Peters has also been with "American Horror Story" since its 2011 beginnings. Chloë Sevigny: A fashion icon before entering film and TV, as with Lady Gaga, Sevigny now has a long cinema and TV resumé, appearing in "Big Love" and "Portlandia,"and guesting on "American Horror Story" series 2 and earning a recall for season 5. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2015. This article was from AFP Relax News and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Actor Sam Shepard arrested for drunken driving in Santa Fe
Tuesday May 26, 2015
Actor Sam Shepard arrested for drunken driving in Santa Fe

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Actor and Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Sam Shepard was arrested Monday on suspicion of drunken driving after a Santa Fe restaurant's security complained about a possibly intoxicated driver. The 71-year-old Shepard told a police officer that he had two tequila drinks and was planning to drive home, Santa Fe police Lt. Andrea Dobyns said Tuesday. "Our officer could smell alcohol on his breath, and he had bloodshot, watery eyes," she said. Shepard was arrested on a charge of aggravated driving while intoxicated outside La Choza restaurant in downtown. The restaurant's security called police about 7:45 p.m. Monday concerned about an intoxicated driver, Dobyns said. The man was trying to leave in the pickup, but the vehicle's emergency brake was engaged. Shepherd declined to take a breath test, but he did perform a field sobriety test, which he failed, Dobyns said. It wasn't immediately clear if Shepard had an attorney. Santa Fe jail records show that Shepard was released Tuesday afternoon after posting bail. The office of Shepard's agent said Tuesday that it had no comment. Shepard won the Pulitzer Prize in 1979 for his play "Buried Child." His film credits, among others, include "Country," ''Baby Boom," ''Steel Magnolias," ''Thunderheart," ''Black Hawk Down," ''The Notebook," and "Walker Payne." Playing Chuck Yeager in a drama about the birth of America's space program, "The Right Stuff" earned Shepard an Academy Award nomination. His play "True West," depicting a rivalry between two estranged brothers, has been revived numerous times and starred high-profile actors over the years. The Sante Fe Institute, a transdisciplinary research community, lists the actor as a Miller Scholar. Monday's arrest appears to be Shepard's second on charges of drunken driving. In January 2009, he was arrested on charges of speeding and drunken driving in the central Illinois town of Normal. Shepard was driving 16 mph over the 30 mph speed limit, police said. A breath test then indicated his blood-alcohol level was double the legal limit. The actor told police then that he had been at a tavern in nearby Bloomington and was heading to a hotel. Shepard pleaded guilty and was fined $600 and court costs and placed on 24 months of supervision. He also had to finish an alcohol treatment program and perform 100 hours of community service. Copyright (2015) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was written by VIK JOLLY from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Rob Thomas releases surprise new single
Tuesday May 26, 2015
Rob Thomas releases surprise new single

"Trust Me", the first new solo release from the Grammy award-winning singer/songwriter in six years, is out nowThe new track, which will serve as a precursor to Thomas's third solo album "The Great Unknown", was co-written with Ryan Tedder, whose star is rapidly rising thanks to recent writing collaborations with Taylor Swift and Beyoncé.  And as well as a new album, expected to be released this summer, Thomas will also be hitting the road. A 39-date North American tour will kick off on June 11 in Ontario, Canada and conclude on August 13 in New Jersey. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2015. This article was from AFP Relax News and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Jessica Lange to return to Broadway in 2016 a familiar role
Tuesday May 26, 2015
Jessica Lange to return to Broadway in 2016 a familiar role

NEW YORK (AP) — Jessica Lange will return to Broadway next spring in a production of "Long Day's Journey Into Night," playing the same role she did 15 years ago in London. The Roundabout Theatre Company said Tuesday that the Oscar- and Emmy-winner will join Gabriel Byrne in a revival of Eugene O'Neill's play in March. Jonathan Kent will direct the production at the American Airlines Theatre. Lange previously played the role of Mary Tyrone in a 2000 production of O'Neill's familial drama in London, receiving an Olivier Award nomination for her performance as the morphine-addicted mother. The "American Horror Story" star made her Broadway debut in a 1992 production of "A Streetcar Named Desire" and returned to the stage in the 2005 revival of "The Glass Menagerie." Copyright (2015) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was written by Mark Kennedy from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Audiard's 'Dheepan' wins Palme d'Or in upset Cannes finale
Tuesday May 26, 2015
Audiard's 'Dheepan' wins Palme d'Or in upset Cannes finale

CANNES, France (AP) — The 68th Cannes Film Festival was brought to a surprising close Sunday with Jacques Audiard's Sri Lankan refugee drama taking the festival's coveted top honor, the Palme d'Or. The choice of "Dheepan," as selected by a jury led by Joel and Ethan Coen, left some critics scratching their heads. While the dapper French filmmaker has drawn widespread acclaim for films such as "A Prophet" and "Rust and Bone," some critics were disappointed by the thriller climax of Audiard's film. "Dheepan" is about a trio of Sri Lankans who pretend to be a family in order to flee their war-torn country and are settled in a violent housing project outside Paris. "This isn't a jury of film critics," Joel Coen told reporters after the awards ceremony, alongside fellow jurors like Guillermo del Toro and Jake Gyllenhaal. "This is a jury of artists who are looking at the work." The win for "Dheepan" comes at a time when Europe is particularly attuned to the experience of immigrants, following the recent deaths of hundreds crossing the Mediterranean, seeking Italian shores. Jury members, though, said "Dheepan" was chosen for its overall strength as a film, rather than any topicality. "We all thought it was a very beautiful movie," said Ethan Coen, calling the decision "swift." ''Everyone had some high level of excitement and enthusiasm for it." Audiard, springing to the podium at the Palais des Festivals, accepted the award with warm gratitude, bowing to the jury. He was joined by the makeshift parents of his film: Kalieaswari Srinivasan and Antonythasan Jesuthasan, who himself was Tamil Tiger child soldier before finding political asylum in France. "To receive a prize from the Coen brothers is exceptional," said Audiard, who added that only receiving one from the Luc and Jean-Pierre Dardenne, the Belgian filmmaking siblings, could equal it. The runner-up prize, the Grand Prix, went to "Son of Saul," a grim Holocaust drama by first-time Hungarian director László Nemes. Some expected Nemes' horrifying plunge into the life of an Auschwitz worker to take the top award, but it's been 26 years since a debut film (Steven Soderbergh's "Sex, Lies, and Videotape") was given the Palme. English actress Sienna Miller and Canadian actor Xavier Dolan, both jury members, sounded especially moved by "Son of Saul." Miller called it "breathtaking" and an extraordinary accomplishment for a first-time filmmaker. "Europe is still haunted by the destruction of the European Jews," said Nemes. "That's something that lives with us." Hou Hsiao-Hsien, the masterful 68-year-old Taiwanese filmmaker, won best director for his first feature in eight years: "The Assassin," a lushly painterly martial arts drama. The best actress prize was split but not the way some expected. It was given to both Rooney Mara, half of the romantic pair of Todd Haynes' '50s lesbian drama "Carol," and Emmanuelle Bercot, the French star of the roller coaster marriage drama "My King." (Bercot also directed the festival opener, "Standing Tall," about a delinquent teenager.) Any split was presumed to go to Mara and her "Carol" co-star, Cate Blanchett. Best actor was awarded to Vincent Lindon, the veteran French actor of Stéphane Brizé's "The Measure of a Man." He plays a man struggling to make a living after a long period of unemployment. The visibly moved Lindon won over some big-name competition, including Michael Caine, the star of Paolo Sorrentino's unrewarded "Youth," a wry, melancholy portrait of old age. Lindon's award added to a banner year at Cannes for France, which had five films out of the 19 in competition and went home with three awards. Yorgos Lanthimos, a Greek filmmaker working in English for the first time, took the jury prize for his "The Lobster," a deadpan dystopian comedy, starring Colin Farrell and Rachel Weisz, about a near-future where unmarried singles are turned into the animal of their choice. "Chronic," an understated drama about a home-care nurse (Tim Roth) for the terminally ill, took best screenplay for Mexican writer-director Michel Franco. Franco and Roth met three years ago when Roth, serving on a Cannes jury, helped award Franco the Un Certain Regard prize. "It's a Cannes story," said Franco. The Camera d'Or, Cannes award for best first feature film, went to "La Tierra Y la Sombra." César Augusto Acevedo's debut, which played in the Critics Week section, is about an old farmer returning home to tend to his gravely ill son. The Coens themselves took the Palme in 1991 for "Barton Fink." The last two Cannes winners have been three-hour art-house epics: the glacial Turkish drama "Winter Sleep," chosen last year by Jane Campion's jury, and "Blue is the Warmest Color," as picked by Steven Spielberg's jury. This year's competition slate left some critics calling it a so-so year for Cannes. Some of the films that drew the biggest raves ("Mad Max: Fury Road," Pixar's "Inside Out") played out of competition, while some in it (like Gus Van Sant's "The Sea of Trees") drew loud boos. The festival was dominated by discussion about gender equality with many — from Blanchett to Jane Fonda — speaking about female opportunity in the movie business. "You hope it's not just the year," said Blanchett of the attention to women in film. "It's not some sort of fashionable moment." An honorary Palme d'Or was also given to French filmmaker Agnes Varda, the first woman to receive one and only the fourth director after Woody Allen, Clint Eastwood and Bernardo Bertolucci. But the festival was overrun by an unlikely scandal when several women were turned away from the formal premiere of Todd Haynes' "Carol" for wearing flat shoes, rather than high heels. The festival insisted it was the mistake of overzealous security guards and not part of Cannes' notoriously strict dress code. The festival, as it often is, was dominated by the unexpected, even on its last night. Nothing was more unforeseen — not even the Palme for "Dheepan" — than John C. Reilly, a co-star of "The Lobster" and another competition entry, "Tale of Tales," took the stage to sing "Just a Gigolo" in a bright white suit. ___ AP's Thomas Adamson contributed to this report. Copyright (2015) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was written by Jake Coyle from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.