Wednesday Sep 3, 2014

LG and Swarovski team to up the brilliance on OLED tv

LG has partnered with Swarovski to create a one-off crystal-studded curved OLED TV, which is due to be unveiled at the IFA consumer technology show in Germany on September 5.As well as incredible picture quality and a curved display that's only 4mm thick, the television's stand features 460...
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TV

LG and Swarovski team to up the brilliance on OLED tv
Wednesday Sep 3, 2014
LG and Swarovski team to up the brilliance on OLED tv

LG has partnered with Swarovski to create a one-off crystal-studded curved OLED TV, which is due to be unveiled at the IFA consumer technology show in Germany on September 5.As well as incredible picture quality and a curved display that's only 4mm thick, the television's stand features 460 hand-applied luminescent Aurora Borealis crystals of three different sizes. The resulting effect, according to LG, is "a subtle but elegant sparkling pattern that turns a cutting-edge television into a work of art." "We are excited to showcase this one-of-a kind TV -- our first collaboration with designers from Swarovski -- to visitors at IFA," said Hyun-hwoi Ha, president and CEO of LG's Home Entertainment Company. "The epitome of luxury and refinement, Swarovski crystals and LG's premium OLED TV complement each other perfectly. The crystals help to create an aesthetic that is, quite simply, gorgeous, while our OLED technology ensures a level of picture quality that is every bit as stunning as one could imagine." Swarovski is becoming the go-to company when manufacturers want to make their electronic devices that bit more desirable, and, as well as this one-off television, a Swarovski crystal-encrusted strap for Samsung's latest smartwatch will also be on display at this year's IFA, along with a host of other Swarovski-created accessories such as smartphone, phablet and tablet covers and even styluses. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2014.

Larry David play heads to Broadway this February
Tuesday Sep 2, 2014
Larry David play heads to Broadway this February

NEW YORK (AP) — Theater fans, get ready to laugh uncomfortably — Larry David has found a Broadway theater and some co-stars for his writing and acting stage debut. Producers said Tuesday that the "Curb Your Enthusiasm" star's play "Fish in the Dark" will star Rosie Perez, Jayne Houdyshell, Jake Cannavale, Jonny Orsini and Jerry Adler. Anna D. Shapiro, who won a Tony Award for staging "August: Osage County," will direct. Previews will begin Feb. 2 at the Cort Theatre and opening night is set for March 5. David, who also was the co-creator, head writer and executive producer of "Seinfeld," has called his play "a comedy about a death in the family." In 2009, he starred in Woody Allen's comedy "Whatever Works" and co-wrote and starred in the HBO film "Clear History." Copyright (2014) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Plans for '24' movie resurface
Tuesday Sep 2, 2014
Plans for '24' movie resurface

Following the finale of "24: Live Another Day," the miniseries that stood in as the show's belated ninth season, producers have returned to the idea of bringing Jack Bauer's adventures to the big screen, TV Line reveals.According to the website, "24" producer Brian Grazer has developed a pitch that he plans to present to 20th Century Fox. The studio, however, is said to be more interested in producing additional miniseries such as the one aired this summer. The idea of a movie on the counterterrorist agent has been in discussion since the show ended its eighth season in May 2010. At the time, the project was shelved due to funding issues and problems with Kiefer Sutherland's schedule. The latest installment in the adventures of Jack Bauer, the miniseries "24: Live Another Day" aired its finale on July 14 in the US. While the ratings were not exceptional, the new episodes were well received by critics and fans on the whole. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2014.

FOX to bring 'Jack Irish' to US audiences
Tuesday Sep 2, 2014
FOX to bring 'Jack Irish' to US audiences

The network has picked up an American adaptation of the Australian miniseries, which was originally headlined by Guy Pearce.Based on the crime novels of Australian author Peter Temple and the Australian TV movies they inspired, "Jack Irish" focuses on a part-time lawyer, debt collector and apprentice cabinet maker who is trying to get his life back on track after the murder of his wife. The character has a knack for ending up in the wrong place at the wrong time. The first two TV movies on the character, "Jack Irish: Bad Debts" and "Black Tide," aired in Australia in October 2012. The third installment, "Dead Point," still featuring Guy Pearce in the title role, was broadcast last April. Written by Seamus Kevin Fahey ("The Following"), the American version is produced by Chernin Entertainment and 20th Century Fox. No details have been released regarding the cast, production timeline or premiere dates. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2014.

Lars Von Trier prepping return to TV
Tuesday Sep 2, 2014
Lars Von Trier prepping return to TV

Twenty years after creating the groundbreaking miniseries "The Kingdom," the director is preparing to return to the small screen with "The House That Jack Built."The project was announced by Louise Vesth, a producer at Lars von Trier's Zentropa film company, during a press conference for the screening of "Nymphomaniac Volume 2: Director's Cut" at the Venice Film Festival. Executive producer Peter Aalbæk Jensen chimed in to describe the project as "without precedent" and added: "You better hold your breath." The English-language series will have a large international cast, although no individual names have been revealed. Details on the plot are also still under wraps. Known for his avant-garde films, including the 2000 Cannes Palme d'Or winner "Dancer in the Dark," von Trier has also worked in TV as the creator and director of "The Kingdom" ("Riget" in the original Danish). Set in a Copenhagen hospital, the story follows a small number of doctors and patients attempting to understand a series of supernatural events. Since the first season, aired in 1994, left a number of questions unanswered, four additional episodes were made three years later. In 2004, Stephen King adapted the drama for American audiences as "Kingdom Hospital." The Danish filmmaker will begin writing the screenplay for "The House That Jack Built" this fall, and production is slated to begin in 2016. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2014.

Movies

Larry David play heads to Broadway this February
Tuesday Sep 2, 2014
Larry David play heads to Broadway this February

NEW YORK (AP) — Theater fans, get ready to laugh uncomfortably — Larry David has found a Broadway theater and some co-stars for his writing and acting stage debut. Producers said Tuesday that the "Curb Your Enthusiasm" star's play "Fish in the Dark" will star Rosie Perez, Jayne Houdyshell, Jake Cannavale, Jonny Orsini and Jerry Adler. Anna D. Shapiro, who won a Tony Award for staging "August: Osage County," will direct. Previews will begin Feb. 2 at the Cort Theatre and opening night is set for March 5. David, who also was the co-creator, head writer and executive producer of "Seinfeld," has called his play "a comedy about a death in the family." In 2009, he starred in Woody Allen's comedy "Whatever Works" and co-wrote and starred in the HBO film "Clear History." Copyright (2014) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

What you watch may affect your snacking: study
Tuesday Sep 2, 2014
What you watch may affect your snacking: study

Studies abound blaming television for the sedentary lifestyle that promotes obesity, but a new study from the Cornell University Food and Brand Lab says weight gain might also be a question of what you watch."We find that if you're watching an action movie while snacking your mouth will see more action too!" says lead author Aner Tal, Ph.D. "In other words, the more distracting the program is the more you will eat." Researchers recruited 94 undergraduates who happily munched on M&Ms, cookies, carrots and grapes during 20 minutes of screen time in which they were randomly assigned to watch part of the action movie "The Island" or talk show "The Charlie Rose Show" or a silent segment from "The Island." Researchers say those who watched "The Island" ate 98 percent more than those who watched "The Charlie Rose Show," and even those who watched the silent segment ate 36 percent more. Overall, those who watched "The Island" consumed an average of 354 calories and the group who viewed the silent version ate 314 calories. The talk show group's average caloric intake was just 215. "More stimulating programs that are fast paced, include many camera cuts, really draw you in and distract you from what you are eating," says Dr. Tal. "They can make you eat more because you're paying less attention to how much you are putting in your mouth." The research team advises pre-portioning snacks and selecting healthy fare which, according to their study, action movie viewers tended to enjoy. The study was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association: Internal Medicine. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2014.

Schoonmaker, Scorsese's right-hand woman, gets top Venice award
Tuesday Sep 2, 2014
Schoonmaker, Scorsese's right-hand woman, gets top Venice award

Oscar-winning film editor Thelma Schoonmaker, who has worked hand-in-hand with director Martin Scorsese for over 40 years, was awarded the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement in Venice on Tuesday.The 74-year-old American has edited some of the biggest selling and critically acclaimed movies of the past 30 years, from "Goodfellas" to "Gangs of New York" and "The Wolf of Wall Street", and only works with Scorsese. After winning Oscars for "Raging Bull", "The Aviator" and "The Departed", Schoonmaker said she was honoured to be awarded the top Venice accolade -- and to be the first film editing artist to receive it in the festival's history. "I had started a six-week course at NYU (New York University) in editing when I first met Marty, and it changed my life," Schoonmaker told journalists at the world's oldest film festival ahead of the ceremony on Lido island in Italy's floating city. "I had no idea what would happen to me in agreeing to work for the man who taught me everything, who got me hooked on this job," she said. Schoonmaker began her collaboration with the famous American director on his debut feature film "Who's That Knocking at My Door" in 1967 and never looked back. "Editing is a mysterious job. We work with a vast amount of material and a screen and have to take thousands of decisions in just a few minutes. "To understand just how marvellous it is you would have to sit next to me and get bored. But there's nothing better in the world," she said. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2014.

Plans for '24' movie resurface
Tuesday Sep 2, 2014
Plans for '24' movie resurface

Following the finale of "24: Live Another Day," the miniseries that stood in as the show's belated ninth season, producers have returned to the idea of bringing Jack Bauer's adventures to the big screen, TV Line reveals.According to the website, "24" producer Brian Grazer has developed a pitch that he plans to present to 20th Century Fox. The studio, however, is said to be more interested in producing additional miniseries such as the one aired this summer. The idea of a movie on the counterterrorist agent has been in discussion since the show ended its eighth season in May 2010. At the time, the project was shelved due to funding issues and problems with Kiefer Sutherland's schedule. The latest installment in the adventures of Jack Bauer, the miniseries "24: Live Another Day" aired its finale on July 14 in the US. While the ratings were not exceptional, the new episodes were well received by critics and fans on the whole. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2014.

VENICE WATCH: Editor honored; surreal Swede shines
Tuesday Sep 2, 2014
VENICE WATCH: Editor honored; surreal Swede shines

VENICE, Italy (AP) — The Venice Film Festival is bringing 11 days of red carpet premieres, innovative movies and Hollywood glamour to the Italian city. Here's what has been catching the eye of The Associated Press. ___ HONOREE SCHOONMAKER TALKS SCORSESE The Venice Film Festival celebrated what has been called the "hidden art" of film editing on Tuesday, bestowing a Golden Lion for career achievement on Martin Scorsese's longtime collaborator Thelma Schoonmaker. Schoonmaker, who has edited all Scorsese's films since "Raging Bull" in 1980, credited the director for her success — "He taught me everything I know." She said it was "the most amazing luck" that she'd meet Scorsese at New York University after being thwarted in her original aim of becoming a U.S. diplomat. "They said I was way too liberal and would be very unhappy in the foreign service," Schoonmaker said. She said her early work on documentaries — including Scorsese's "Woodstock" — gave her the skills to edit the improvisations Scorsese draws from his actors, most recently in "The Wolf of Wall Street." "It was wonderful when Marty realized that Matthew McConaughey and Jonah Hill and Leo (DiCaprio) could improvise," she said. "He just let them fly. And so I had tons of wonderful improvisation I had to shape." She and Scorsese remain one of the most productive partnerships in the movies. Schoonmaker said their next project will be "so different from 'Wolf of Wall Street' you can't imagine." —By Jill Lawless, http://Twitter.com/JillLawless ___ SWEDISH SURREALISM STORMS VENICE The title was enough to get people talking, and "A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence" has become one of the hits of the Venice Film Festival. Swedish director Roy Andersson's film is a series of surreal, bleakly comic vignettes that mix the mundane with deadpan humor and unthinking cruelty. Wandering through the film are two sad-sacks who sell vampire teeth and other jokey novelties. They're the least jolly salesmen imaginable, and no one is buying. The movie had audience members laughing and scratching their heads in equal measure Tuesday. The Guardian newspaper called it "a glorious metaphysical burlesque," while the Daily Telegraph called Andersson's work "sublime, ridiculous" and untranslatable. Andersson said he wanted to explore the cruelty humans are able to inflict on one another, and how it persists down the ages. The movie is set in a drab corner of modern Sweden, but the country's 18th-century King Charles XII and his army burst into proceedings. "I hope that people can see that daily life can also be poetic even when it's banal," Andersson said. "That's my ambition — that banal life can also be poetic." The film, which took four years to make, is shot with a static camera in a series of deep-focus tableaux. Andersson, 71, said he was inspired by the social vision of painters including Peter Brueghel and Otto Dix to abandon the traditional narratives of his early films for the fragmented vignettes of this film and its predecessors "You, the Living" and "Songs From the Second Floor." "I don't tell stories. I want to make pictures," he said. "It's boring for me to look at cinema with stories." Some have compared Andersson to the great Swedish filmmaker Ingmar Bergman. But he sees one essential difference. "As I see it, Ingmar Bergman had no humor." —By Louise Dixon and Jill Lawless Copyright (2014) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Events

'Gone Girl,' 'Unbroken' lead drumbeat of fall
Tuesday Sep 2, 2014
'Gone Girl,' 'Unbroken' lead drumbeat of fall

NEW YORK (AP) — Unable to find her second directing project, Angelina Jolie took to sifting through "generals." Looking for a diamond in the rough, the actress-turned-director searched the movies that studios owned but weren't making. "So I scanned through these generals and landed on 'Unbroken,' a story of resilience and strength and the human spirit, of faith and survival at sea," says Jolie. "It was about three sentences and I came home and I said to Brad, 'What about this one?' And he said, 'Oh, honey, that one's been around forever.' It had a reputation for being one that never gets done." But "Unbroken" — the true tale of Louis Zamperini, a track star who was lost in the Pacific for 47 days after his plane was shot down during World War II — stuck with Jolie, even though it had been kicking around Hollywood for decades. "It was like a fever, an obsession," she says. "So I fought for it and I fought for it and I fought for it," says Jolie. "It took me months of fighting to get the job." Even for the world's most famous stars, determination is a necessary ingredient for the fall movie season. Few of the fall's films haven't had to claw their way to theaters. It's a season for the movies' most unconventional thinkers, the ones dedicated to making a tragic Olympic wrestler drama ("Foxcatcher") or finding humor in North Korea ("The Interview"). Led by "Unbroken" (Dec. 25), this year's fall is a battlefield of war stories, including Jolie's (new) husband Brad Pitt on the Western Front in "Fury" (Oct. 17), a WWII drama about a tank of American soldiers. Clint Eastwood also returns for his second film this year with "American Sniper" (Dec. 25), starring Bradley Cooper as an elite Navy SEAL marksman. American tales, both triumphant and warped, will be numerous. In the based-on-a-true-story "Foxcatcher" (Nov. 14) from Bennett Miller, an Olympic wrestler (Channing Tatum) is taken in by a rich but demented benefactor (Steve Carell). A year after David Oyelowo and Oprah Winfrey co-starred in "The Butler," they reteam for "Selma" (Dec. 25), in which Oyelowo plays Martin Luther King. (Winfrey is a producer.) In "The Interview" (also Dec. 25) from Seth Rogen and his directing partner Evan Goldberg, Rogen and James Franco play journalists asked by the CIA to assassinate Kim Jong-un. It's distinguished as the only autumn film a country (North Korea) has asked President Obama to block. An almost as unlikely international pairing comes in "Rosewater," Jon Stewart's adaptation of Maziar Bahari memoir about being imprisoned for 118 days for reporting for Newsweek on the 2009 Iranian elections. Many of the upcoming films — like Alejandro Inarritu's "Birdman, or the Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance" with Michael Keaton (Oct. 17), and the Reese Witherspoon drama "Wild" (Dec. 5) — will drum up anticipation on the festival circuit and hope to be drafted into the awards season industrial complex, an increasingly all-consuming annual rite of hype-soaked frenzy. This year, one film will set the season's beat unlike any other: "Whiplash" (Oct. 23). In the Sundance hit, Miles Teller plays an obsessively focused jazz drummer at an elite New York conservatory under the strict tutelage of a drill-sergeant teacher (J.K. Simmons). "Absolutely where I connected to Andrew was his drive and his ambition," says Teller, the 27-year-old actor whose 2013 breakout with "The Spectacular Now" will continue with "Whiplash." ''You can look at this movie and say, 'It's destroying him. It's killing him. He's giving away his humanity for his art.' But a lot of people go through life not caring about anything remotely as much as Andrew cares about drumming." Whereas Teller is a fresh face to the gauntlet of awards season, David Fincher is a seasoned veteran — one who has consistently avoided the season's trappings. He directs one of the fall's most anticipated movies, "Gone Girl" (Oct. 3), an adaptation of the best-selling Gillian Flynn novel, starring Ben Affleck. Other heavyweight filmmakers, of course, will be debuting films this fall, including Paul Thomas Anderson's Thomas Pynchon adaptation, "Inherent Vice" (Dec. 12), starring Joaquin Phoenix. But no film is more eagerly awaited than Christopher Nolan's "Interstellar" (Nov. 7), a philosophical science fiction thriller starring Matthew McConaughey. A year after his Oscar win for "Dallas Buyers Club," the McConaissance is going to space. After a weak overall summer box office (down 14.7 percent from 2013), movies like "Mockingjay," the Will Smith-produced musical "Annie" (Dec. 19), Ridley Scott's Moses epic, "Exodus: Gods and Kings" (Dec. 12) and Peter Jackson's final Tolkien film, "The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies" (Dec. 17) will try to bring the crowds back. ___ Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jake_coyle Copyright (2014) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Larry David play heads to Broadway this February
Tuesday Sep 2, 2014
Larry David play heads to Broadway this February

NEW YORK (AP) — Theater fans, get ready to laugh uncomfortably — Larry David has found a Broadway theater and some co-stars for his writing and acting stage debut. Producers said Tuesday that the "Curb Your Enthusiasm" star's play "Fish in the Dark" will star Rosie Perez, Jayne Houdyshell, Jake Cannavale, Jonny Orsini and Jerry Adler. Anna D. Shapiro, who won a Tony Award for staging "August: Osage County," will direct. Previews will begin Feb. 2 at the Cort Theatre and opening night is set for March 5. David, who also was the co-creator, head writer and executive producer of "Seinfeld," has called his play "a comedy about a death in the family." In 2009, he starred in Woody Allen's comedy "Whatever Works" and co-wrote and starred in the HBO film "Clear History." Copyright (2014) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Schoonmaker, Scorsese's right-hand woman, gets top Venice award
Tuesday Sep 2, 2014
Schoonmaker, Scorsese's right-hand woman, gets top Venice award

Oscar-winning film editor Thelma Schoonmaker, who has worked hand-in-hand with director Martin Scorsese for over 40 years, was awarded the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement in Venice on Tuesday.The 74-year-old American has edited some of the biggest selling and critically acclaimed movies of the past 30 years, from "Goodfellas" to "Gangs of New York" and "The Wolf of Wall Street", and only works with Scorsese. After winning Oscars for "Raging Bull", "The Aviator" and "The Departed", Schoonmaker said she was honoured to be awarded the top Venice accolade -- and to be the first film editing artist to receive it in the festival's history. "I had started a six-week course at NYU (New York University) in editing when I first met Marty, and it changed my life," Schoonmaker told journalists at the world's oldest film festival ahead of the ceremony on Lido island in Italy's floating city. "I had no idea what would happen to me in agreeing to work for the man who taught me everything, who got me hooked on this job," she said. Schoonmaker began her collaboration with the famous American director on his debut feature film "Who's That Knocking at My Door" in 1967 and never looked back. "Editing is a mysterious job. We work with a vast amount of material and a screen and have to take thousands of decisions in just a few minutes. "To understand just how marvellous it is you would have to sit next to me and get bored. But there's nothing better in the world," she said. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2014.

Bieber charged with assault over photo incident
Tuesday Sep 2, 2014
Bieber charged with assault over photo incident

TORONTO (AP) — Canadian pop star Justin Bieber faces new charges after he was arrested for dangerous driving and assault following a collision between a minivan and an ATV that led to a physical altercation involving a photographer, his lawyer said Tuesday. Ontario Provincial Police said Bieber, who was driving the ATV, and an occupant of the minivan "engaged in a physical altercation," Friday afternoon near Bieber's hometown of Stratford. "Justin Bieber and Selena Gomez's peaceful retreat in Stratford this weekend was unfortunately disrupted by the unwelcome presence of the paparazzi," Brian Greenspan, Bieber's Toronto lawyer, said Tuesday. "This has regrettably resulted in charges of dangerous driving and assault. Mr. Bieber and Ms. Gomez have fully cooperated in the police investigation. We are hopeful that this matter will be quickly resolved." Bieber, 20, turned himself in to a police station Monday and was arrested, then released on a promise to appear in court Sept. 29, Constable Kees Wijnands said. Wijnands said there were no injuries as a result of the collision, but could not say whether there were any injuries from the altercation. "It wasn't a big deal for us. We knew he was here. He's a local boy. We weren't going to make a big deal of it," Wijnands said, adding that Beiber was riding with a passenger. Bieber was photographed Friday riding on an ATV vehicle with on-and-off again girlfriend actress and a singer Selena Gomez. Just a few days before the incident, Bieber's car was hit from behind by a vehicle driven by a photographer in Hollywood and the Grammy Award-nominated singer tweeted: "There should be laws against what I just experienced. We should have learned from the death of Princess Diana..." He also tweeted: "I don't have a problem with Paparazzi but when they act recklessly they put us all in danger." Earlier this month, Bieber pleaded guilty to misdemeanor charges of careless driving and resisting arrest seven months after his arrest in Miami Beach following what police initially called an illegal street drag race. Bieber is also charged in Toronto with assaulting a limousine driver in late December. Police allege Bieber hit a limousine driver several times in the back of the head after he and five others were picked up in the early hours of Dec. 30. His lawyers have said he is not guilty in that case. There is a court hearing in that case scheduled for Sept. 8, but Greenspan said Bieber won't attend. Also in Miami, Bieber faces a lawsuit by a photographer who alleges he was roughed up while shooting pictures of the singer outside a recording studio. In July, Bieber pleaded no contest to a misdemeanor vandalism charge for throwing eggs at a neighbor's house in Los Angeles. He agreed to pay more than $80,000 in damages, meet a number of other conditions and was sentenced to two years' probation. Bieber rocketed to fame at age 15. He was nominated for two Grammy Awards for his 2010 full-length album debut "My World 2.0," but sales of his latest records have fallen off. Copyright (2014) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Chris Brown pleads guilty to assault in Washington
Tuesday Sep 2, 2014
Chris Brown pleads guilty to assault in Washington

WASHINGTON (AP) — Chris Brown pleaded guilty on Tuesday to punching a man in the face outside a Washington hotel, an assault that occurred while the singer was on probation for attacking his then-girlfriend Rihanna. Brown pleaded guilty to misdemeanor assault and was sentenced to time served. He spent two days in a District of Columbia jail in the case, one that further tarnished the image of the Grammy-winning singer. Brown, 25, admitted that he hit a man who tried to get in a picture the singer was taking with two women outside the W hotel a few blocks from the White House last October. The victim, Parker Adams, suffered a broken nose. At the time of the arrest, Brown was on probation in a felony assault case for attacking pop star Rihanna hours before the 2009 Grammy awards. The arrest led a judge in California to revoke his probation, and he was ordered in May to serve an additional 131 days in jail. He was released in June. Brown's attorney, Danny Onorato, argued that Brown had already suffered extensive consequences from the Washington case, noting the additional jail time in California and the four months he spent receiving inpatient counseling. He said that Brown's career has been on hold for nearly a year and that he wanted to take responsibility for his actions so he could go back to work, including a tour in support of a new album. "To say that he's been punished severely in this matter is an understatement," Onorato said. Brown spoke only briefly, saying: "I would like to say to the court that I'm sorry." He did not comment as he left court, swarmed by photographers and a handful of fans. Brown had previously pleaded not guilty in the case. A trial scheduled for April was delayed, and two previous attempts to reach a plea deal fell through. Onorato said there were "nuances" of difference in the potential deals. "As Chris Brown himself has now finally acknowledged, he punched a man in the face without provocation," U.S. Attorney Ronald Machen said in a statement. "No matter your status or celebrity, you will be held accountable for such conduct in our city." Brown had a squeaky-clean image before his attack on Rihanna, but since then he has had several flare-ups that have been reported to authorities and noted by Los Angeles prosecutors. Brown broke a window after a 2011 "Good Morning America" interview in New York and was accused of snatching a woman's cellphone in Miami after she tried to snap pictures of the singer. He was also slightly injured in a New York nightclub brawl and, earlier this year, was accused of being involved in a fistfight with Frank Ocean's entourage over a parking spot at a West Hollywood recording studio. He was not charged in any of the incidents, but they have hurt his public standing. Nonetheless, legions of fans, including many of his more than 13 million Twitter followers, continue to support him. Following the hearing, he tweeted "#XTheAlbum," a reference to his new recording, due out Sept. 16. Onorato said his client has learned to "be more judicious" in his dealings with the public. "He's an incredibly talented and charismatic kid," Onorato said. "I think he's misperceived a lot. He's a wonderful person, and I'm glad this is behind him." Brown's bodyguard, Christopher Hollosy, was convicted of misdemeanor assault in April for his role in the same scuffle. He has not yet been sentenced. The victim, Adams, has also filed a $1.5 million lawsuit against Brown and Hollosy. ___ Follow Ben Nuckols on Twitter at https://twitter.com/APBenNuckols. Copyright (2014) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.